AN ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE PERSPECTIVE ON ROLE EMERGENCE AND ROLE ENACTMEN.pdf

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ABSTRACTTitle:AN ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE PERSPECTIVE ONROLE EMERGENCE AND ROLE ENACTMENTSophia V. Marinova, Doctor of Philosophy, 2005Directed By:Professor Paul E. Tesluk, Department of Management andOrganizationOrganizational culture has received ample attention both in the popular andscholarly press as an important factor predicting organizational effectiveness byinducing employees to behave effectively (Cooke & Rousseau, 1988; Schein, 1985,1990). The assertion that culture leads to behavior, however, has received onlylimited empirical support. The purpose of this dissertation is to explicate the impactof organizational culture on employees' roles and subsequent role behaviors. Ipropose that four types of cultures (clan, entrepreneurial, market and hierarchy) exertdifferent and at times competing pressures, thus, creating distinct role schemasregarding the range of expected employee behaviors, which in turn, guide distinctforms of employee role behavior (e.g. helping, innovation, achievement andcompliance).In addition, I examine boundary conditions on the relationships betweenculture and role perceptions and role perceptions and behavior. I propose that in theprocess of role emergence, culture strength as an organizational level characteristic,
cognitive self-monitoring, and perceived person-organization (P-O) fit influence thedegree to which individuals interpret and incorporate the organizational culture’snorms as part of their roles at work.I also suggest that culture strength, behavioralself-monitoring as well as P-O fit have an impact on the extent to which employeesenact the expected organizational work roles.Data from about hundred different organizations were collected to test theproposed relationships. The empirical results provide support for most of theproposed relationships between culture and employee roles, thereby validating therole of culture in establishing what is expected and valued at work. In addition,culture strength had moderating effect on the linkages between culture and employeeroles for two of the culture dimensions (clan and hierarchical). Surprisingly, self-monitoring (cognitive) had a significant moderating effect but in a direction differentfrom the predicted. Perceived fit moderated the relationship between market cultureand helping role. Innovative role exhibited a negative significant relationship withcompliant behavior while market strength intensified the negative relationshipbetween achievement role and helping behavior. Thus, the results lend some supportto the overall framework. Implications for theory and practice, as well as directionsfor future research, are discussed.
AN ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE PERSPECTIVE ON ROLE EMERGENCEAND ROLE ENACTMENTBySophia V. MarinovaDissertation submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of theUniversity of Maryland, College Park, in partial fulfillmentof the requirements for the degree ofDoctor of Philosophy2005Advisory Committee:Professor Paul E. Tesluk, ChairProfessor Paul HangesProfessor Henry P. SimsProfessor Cynthia K. StevensProfessor M. Susan Taylor
© Copyright bySophia V. Marinova2005

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The Land, organizational culture perspective, Culture and Culture Strength 87

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