CEP301_WordRecognition - Maximizing Students Word...

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Maximizing Students’ Word Maximizing Students’ Word Recognition Skills Recognition Skills Gary A. Troia, Ph.D. Gary A. Troia, Ph.D. Michigan State University Michigan State University
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Why is Word Recognition Important to Why is Word Recognition Important to Literacy Achievement? Literacy Achievement? Good readers process virtually every letter in each word and every word in text to derive meaning Almost all poor readers exhibit slow and inaccurate word recognition, which often hampers comprehension Children who are not proficient readers by the end of third grade are likely to continue to be poor readers for the rest of their lives, profoundly limiting their employability and quality of life
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How Does Word Recognition How Does Word Recognition Typically Develop? Typically Develop? Initially, children use a phonological recording strategy to “sound out” words With each attempt to decode a word (only a few attempts are needed by average readers), larger bits of word specific orthographic information are layered upon smaller bits As other words with similar orthographic patterns are read, orthographic knowledge generalizes to novel words so that children can read by analogy Ultimately, children employ an orthographic strategy to recognize words by “sight”
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Painfully Graphophonemic relations: p is associated with /p/ Phonological rime pattern: pain rhymes with chain, lane, and vein Graphological rime pattern: pain shares the same spelling pattern as train , main , and rain Syllable structure: pain-ful-ly Morphological structure: pain (noun) + ful (suffix meaning “full of”) + ly (suffix meaning “in a particular way”) Whole word representation: painfully
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Alphabetic reading (i.e., phonological recoding or decoding) relies on two sources of information: (a) phonemic awareness and (b) graphophonemic relations Knowledge of symbol-sound associations permits children to map phonemes onto their matching graphemes To exploit the alphabetic principle, children must appreciate the segmental nature of speech, which is no easy accomplishment
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Orthographic reading relies on two fundamental skills as well: (a) alphabetic knowledge and (b) rapid storage and retrieval of information
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