Geovisualization_2.pdf - About Topics Contact Us Navigate to Enter a word \u2022 \u2022 \u2022 \u2022 \u2022 \u2022 \u2022 Search Topic Description References Author and

Geovisualization_2.pdf - About Topics Contact Us Navigate...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 8 pages.

Navigate to...Enter a wordSearchTopic DescriptionReferencesAuthor and citation infoInstructional ResourcesAdditional ResourcesRelated TopicsKeywordsCV-35 - GeovisualizationGeovisualization is primarily understood as the process of interactively visualizing geographic information in any of the steps in spatial analyses, even though it can also refer to the visual output (e.g., plots, maps, combinations of these), or the associated techniques. Rooted in cartography, geovisualization emerged as a research thrust with the leadership of Alan MacEachren (Pennsylvania State University) and colleagues when interactive maps and digitally-enabled exploratory data analysis led to a paradigm shift in 1980s and 1990s. A core argument for geovisualization is that visual thinking using maps is integral to the scientific process and hypothesis generation, and the role of maps grew beyond communicating the end results of an analysis or documentation process. As such, geovisualization interacts with a number of disciplines including cartography, visual analytics, information visualization, scientific visualization, statistics, computer science, art-and-design, and cognitive science; borrowing from and contributing to each. In this entry, we provide a definition and a brief history of geovisualization including its fundamental concepts, elaborate on its relationship to other disciplines, and briefly review the skills/tools that are relevant in working with geovisualization environments. We finish the entry with a list of learning objectives, instructional questions, and additional resources.Author and Citation Info: Çöltekin, A., Janetzko, H., and Fabrikant, S. I. (2018). Geovisualization. The Geographic Information Science & Technology Body of Knowledge(2nd Quarter 2018 Edition), John P. Wilson (Ed). DOI:10.22224/gistbok/2018.2.6.This entry was first published on June 15, 2018. No earlier editions exist.Topic Description: 1.Definitions2.Description3.Geovisualization Environments1. DefinitionsCartography:3an influential conceptual model by MacEachren (1994) summarizing important dimensions in geovisualization (users, tasks, and interaction)user: one of the dimensions in the Cartography3, characterizing user groups as public vs. experttask: one of the dimensions in the Cartography3, referring to key concepts of exploration and communicationinteraction: one of the dimensions in the Cartography3, referring to levels of interaction (low vs. high)communication: information transfer using a (visual) languageconfirmation: once a hypothesis is formed, using statistical methods to analyze and confirm the observed relationships in the datacognitive walkthrough:a process in usability evaluation in which a set of questions from the perspective of the user is asked and answered by the team conducting the usability studyexploration:the process of examining a dataset in a systematic manner through summarizing, plotting and conducting statistical
Background image
Image of page 2

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 8 pages?

  • Spring '16
  • prof. Maximillan tumbo

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture