12 Angry Men Analysis.docx - Michael Richardson u201c12...

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Michael Richardson “12 Angry Men” Analysis “12 Angry Men” Analysis The film “12 Angry Men” shows in great detail how group dynamics can lead to success or failure. In the movie, a jury of 12 men are tasked with deciding whether a son has murdered his own father. None of them are allowed to leave the room until a unanimous decision is reached. What we witness, as this process ensues, is the forming of structures and functions of the group in real time. Each juror is represented fully, and it is made clear the role of each in the group. At the start of the movie, we see eleven of the twelve jurors vote guilty and are ready to leave. This is before any discussion has even taken place. Since the entire jury pool has to vote unanimously, the eleven are forced to actually deliberate the case with one another. This is when the dynamics of the group really begin to show. The entire spectrum of positions is displayed in the movie. The ones that stood out to me most are bigotry, strictly analytical thinking, group think, the leadership role, the subdued observer, the dominator, emotional decision maker, the conformist, the non-conformist, and some who just don’t care. To explain these, I will go through each juror 1-12 individually. Juror number one is the person who immediately sets out to impose order among the group and, having been named the jury foreman, this is the role he is supposed to take. It is obvious, however, that he is not particularly comfortable in this role. In the sixth minute of the film, he tells the other jurors “You can handle this however you would like; I am not going to give you any rules.” To which he is promptly interrupted by another juror who is ready to vote now and get it over with. The only time that juror number one seems to ever relax during discussions is when he talks about football.
Michael Richardson “12 Angry Men” Analysis Juror two is an accountant by trade and takes the role of the subdued observer. He doesn’t

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