DeSotoAndRoe - Some key themes that come out of the...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Some key themes that come out of the readings by De Soto and Roe: De Soto makes an argument about changing property rules – what does he see as  the goal of these changes? In his argument, I see mainly a concern with increasing  total productivity, total  economic growth.  One thing this leaves unexamined is the distribution   of the rewards of that  productivity. Whenever people recommend changes that lead to improvements in  "a country" or "an economy," think about the fact that all benefits are not  distributed equally in any existing society. What does the recommendation (by de  Soto or others we read) mean, in that case?  Another issue, raised by Professor Brown in lecture, is the existence of other  inequalities in society – those to do with political, physical/military, or other kinds  of power. What does the proposed change mean in relation to people on different  sides of these power inequalities?  Many people pointed out that the fact that any change is likely to create winners  and losers (either along the same side as existing inequality, or changing the  inequalities, or even making it more equal –which would require some people  who have a lot to give something up). The question is who they will be? Roe's discussion of "backlash" suggests that sometimes people will see themselves  as the losers. Interestingly, he also suggests that the backlash may not be purely in  response to economic loss, but also people's sense of fairness. This suggests that  there are multiple factors that lead to the success of a society (economically and  otherwise).  And now, comments on the reading responses: Neil Libbe raises the point about winners and losers in his very good question  about sacrifice and economic development. I encourage everyone to keep in mind  in the coming weeks, particular in this week and next week as we talk about  slavery.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern