Jane Eyre - Themes & Symbols - Themes in Jane Eyre 1 Family...

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Themes in Jane Eyre:1. Family:The main quest in Jane Eyre is Jane's search for a family, for a sense of belonging and love. However this search is constantly tempered by Jane's need for independence The feeling of loneliness is a common theme throughout both Jane’s childhood and adulthood She begins the novel as an unloved organ who is almost obsessed with finding love as a way to establish her own identity and achieve happiness Although she doesn't receive any parental love from Mrs. Reed, jane finds surrogate maternal figures throughout the rest of the novel. Bessie, Miss. Temple and even Mrs. Fairfax care for Jane and give her the love and guidance that she needsJane still doesn't feel as though she has found her true family until she falls inlove with mr. Rochester FriendshipHelen Burns exemplifies the selfless love of a friendShe made her feel loved, belonged and worth2. ReligionJane receives 3 different models of christianity throughout the novel, of whichshe choose what to believe She encounters three main religious figures: Mr. Brocklehurst, Helen Burns, and St. John RiversMr. Brocklehurst’s evangelicalism if full of hypocrisy: he feeds off the benefits of privation and humility and he indulges in a life of luxury while he emotionally abuses the students at Lowood, and convinces that they must live a simple life and follow the word of God. Helen Burns's version of christianity is full of absolute forgiveness and tolerance is too meek for Jane's taste. Helen constantly suffers her punishments silently and eventually dies. During her time with Jane, she taught her that she shan't be vengeful towards those who did her wrong because they will eventually face their punishments. Her form of christianity is very pure St. John practices a christianity of utter piousness, righteousness, and involves no passion. Jane rejects his marriage proposal as much for his detached brand of spirituality as for its certain intrusion on her independenceAlthough Jane ends up rejecting all three models of religion, she does not abandon morality, spiritualism, or a belief in a Christian GodHowever, Jane looks to God in her own way throughout the novel, particularly after she learns of Mr. Rochester’s previous marriage and before st. John takes her in to moor house. She also learns to adapt Helen's forgiveness without becoming completely passiveJane ultimately finds a comfortable middle ground. Her spiritual understanding is not hateful and oppressive like Brocklehurst’s, nor does it require retreat from the everyday world as Helen’s and St. John’s religions do3. Social Position
Bronte uses the novel to discuss and show the the Victorian class differences Jane is consistently a poor individual within a wealthy environment, particularly with the Reeds and at thornfield. Her poverty creates numerous obstacles for her and her pursuit of happiness, including personal insecurity and the denial of opportunitiesMs. Ingrams higher social standing, for instance, makes her Jane's main

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