Literary Devices and Terms.docx - Literary Devices and...

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Literary Devices and Terms A literary device is any tool used in literature to help the reader understand the story and its character(s). Literary terms are not devices. They are simply terms used to understand literature. There are two types of literary devises used by authors, literary elements and literary techniques . 1. Literary elements provide structure to the literature. All literary elements are evident in all literature that creates a story. 2. Literary techniques are specific to each author. Authors choose which of the techniques to employ. Literary Elements Point of View Point of view is the vantage point from which a story is told. First Person : The narrator is a character, often the main character, of the story. This character reveals personal thoughts and feelings but is unable to tell the feelings of others unless he or she is told by another character. The first person narrator refers to him or herself as “I.” Third Person Objective : The narrator is an outsider, not a character. The third person objective reports what is happening (seen and heard), but cannot tell the reader what characters are thinking. Third Person Limited: The narrator is an outsider, not a character. The third person objective reports what is happening as well as the thoughts of one specific character. Omniscient: This is the all-knowing narrator. The omniscient point of view sees everything and hears everything, and is able to see into the minds of multiple characters. Setting Setting generally provides the time and place of a specific scene or chapter, the entire story, a play or a narrative poem. Setting can also include the mood of the time period, situation or event. Setting can also be the social, political, environmental or emotional climate. Setting can also include the emotional state of a character. Character The term character refers to a person or an animal in a story, play or other literary work. Round characters are complex and multidimensional, like real people. Flat characters are one dimensional and superficial; they can be described in a single sentence. A Dynamic Character changes as a result of the events of the story. A Static Character changes very little or not at all through the literary work. Stock characters are predictable stereotypes of people. A character’s motivation is any force (i.e.: love, fear, jealousy) that drives the character to behave in a particular way. Characterization Characterization is the way a writer reveals the personality of a character. Characterization is how the author develops and uses the characters to tell a story. Characterization is often the most important aspect of a story.
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