report (4).docx - ABSTRACT Many products and components are subjected to torsional forces during their operation Products such as biomedical catheter

report (4).docx - ABSTRACT Many products and components are...

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ABSTRACT Many products and components are subjected to torsional forces during their operation. Products such as biomedical catheter tubing, switches, fasteners, and automotive steering columns are just a few devices subject to such torsional stresses. By testing these products in torsion, manufacturers are able to simulate real life service conditions, check product quality, verify designs, and ensure proper manufacturing techniques. This experiment examined the principle of torsion test through measurement of the applied torque and the angle of twist of a dumbbell specimen ability. The test was to determine the torsion properties subjected to pure torque and identify types of fracture surface under pure torque. The torsion test experiment is performed on a mild steel rod using a manual torsion test machine. The rod is fixed at one end to the machine where the torque is measured, while the other end is connected to a chuck that is rotated by a hand-operated crank. A large analogue dial gauge, and the torque sensor digital signal that is read by software, indicates the torque (in-lb) applied to the rod as the rod is twisted by the hand crank. The rotational encoder is attached to the rod by screws and its digital output to software gives the relative angle of twist developed in the rod as the torque is applied. The torque-twist data is used to compute the shear strain and the shear stress on the rod. From the shear stress-shear strain relational curve, the shear modulus of elasticity (rigidity) can be calculated, as well as the proportionality limit and the yield limit for each applied torque. From the experiment the date are taken and calculations and graphs are constructed. Using the formulas we can say that the torque is increasing faster than the other variables which would cause it to slowly get smaller. 1
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TABLE OF CONTENT LIST OF TABLE ...................................................................................................................... 3 LIST OF FIGURES .................................................................................................................. 3 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................... 5 THEORY ................................................................................................................................... 6 EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE ......................................................................................... 9 RESULT .................................................................................................................................. 10 DISCUSSION ......................................................................................................................... 12 CONCLUSION ....................................................................................................................... 16 REFERENCES ……………………………………………………………………………………………... 20 APPENDICES ........................................................................................................................ 21 PRESENTATION OF TABLE ………………………………………………………………………… 25 TEAM WORK ........................................................................................................................ 26 2
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LIST OF TABLE LIST OF FIGURES 3 Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) Material Diameter ( mm ) Length ( mm) Mild Steel 6 85.6
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4 Torsion Test Machine Mild Steel Specimen (initial state) Torque Meter Vernier Caliper Mild Steel Specimen (final state)
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INTRODUCTION In many areas of engineering applications, materials are sometimes subjected to torsion in services, for example, drive shafts, axles and twisted drills. Moreover, structural applications such as bridges, springs, car bodies, airplane fuselages and boat hulls are randomly subjected to torsion. The materials used in this case should require not only adequate strength but also be able to withstand torque in operation.
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