Phe 525 Final paper.docx - Running head ANALYSIS OF THE...

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Running head: ANALYSIS OF THE NATIONAL DIABETES PREVENTION PROGRAM’S IMPACT ON DIABETIC NEUROPATHY Analysis of the National Diabetes Prevention Program's Impact on Diabetic Neuropathy Asia Chatman Southern New Hampshire University October 13, 2019
2 Introduction Peripheral Neuropathy The public health issue of peripheral neuropathy, or peripheral nerve disease, is experienced by many people and is a result of various factors and diseases. Peripheral neuropathy is a condition that pertains to the damaging of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and its signals. PNS concerns the nerves and ganglia that are located outside of the brain and spinal cord nerves which are the two main components of the central nervous system (CNS). The PNS interacts with the CNS by intaking information from sensory neurons and then send signals to the CNS where the signals are translated to actions. With peripheral neuropathy, these signals get disrupted, therefore the translation is disrupted. Signals disruptions can usually occur in several ways: loss of signal, signals occurring when they shouldn’t be, and disruptions within the messages themselves that are sent (NINDS, 2019). Peripheral neuropathy can potentially be a result of various diseases including diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and tooth disease. Common symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are motor nerve damage, sensory nerve damage, and autonomic nerve damage resulting in symptoms including weakness, abnormal sensations, and pain (NINDS, 2019). I chose the public health issue of peripheral neuropathy because it affects numerous populations as well as has limited attention of treatments in programs that pertain to neurological conditions. In this analysis, we will be discussing peripheral neuropathy as it mainly pertains to diabetes. Peripheral neuropathy is common in diabetic individuals and even pre-diabetic individuals, from mild to severe forms (Iqbal et al., 2018) . There are two types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2 with type 2 being the most common. Diabetes as common as it is, is still under reported so there are mostly likely more diabetic individuals. However, just based on self-
3 reported type and current insulin users, 1.3 million adults or 0.55% of U.S. adults had diagnosed type 1 diabetes. About 21.0 million adults or 8.6% had diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Of all diagnosed cases, 5.8% were type 1 diabetes, and 90.9% were type 2 diabetes. The remaining 3.3% of cases of diagnosed diabetic individuals were diagnosed with uncommon types of diabetes (Bullard et al., 2018) . It is approximated that over 90% of diagnosed diabetic individuals in general have experienced symptoms of peripheral neuropathy disease, mainly exclaiming symptoms of nerve pain (Schreiber, Nones, Reis, Chichorro, & Cunha, 2015) .In a study to review current literature about the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), it was found that the prevalence of neuropathy was 50% in patients who developed diabetes, 49% in those with prediabetes, and 29% in controls out of a San Luis Valley Cohort (Iqbal et al., 2018). This shows that even in smaller populations, diabetic individuals

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