lecture4

lecture4 - Phonation or, converting airflow into sound The...

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Phonation or, converting airflow into sound
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The story so far To produce voice, we need a source of energy, something vibrating to set the air particles in motion, and a filter (resonator) to shape the vibrations into speech sounds. The source of energy is air coming in a controlled fashion from the lungs.
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What we need next Something to convert that airflow into sound. This is what the larynx does. Also called the voicebox A valve that protects the airway Provides a rigid chest for lifting and pushing Opens completely for breathing, opens narrowly for whisper, closes completely to protect airway, vibrates to produce sound
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Where is the larynx? Sits on top of the trachea, suspended from the hyoid bone A set of interconnected cartilages Complex muscular attachments to chin, chest, tongue
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The thyroid cartilage
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The cricoid cartilage
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The arytenoid cartilages
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The larynx, reassembled
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The intrinsic laryngeal muscles Control the position of the laryngeal cartilages with respect to each other The smallest and fastest muscles in the body Two general kinds: Adductors (close the vocal folds for phonation or to protect the airway) Abductors (open the folds for breathing)
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Interarytenoid muscle (adductor) Lateral cricoarytenoid muscle (adductor) Posterior cricoarytenoid (abductor)
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This note was uploaded on 04/01/2008 for the course COMM 119 taught by Professor Kreiman during the Winter '07 term at UCLA.

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lecture4 - Phonation or, converting airflow into sound The...

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