Misery. Zuniga, C..docx - King Zuniga 1 The novel Misery is...

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King Zuniga 1 The novel Misery is told by the perspective of Paul, a famous successful author. Due to this perspective we are unable to know his antagonist thoughts and therefore rely on Paul for information. Throughout the novel we see a pattern of escalation and withheld information which adds important elements to the novel. The elements that are achieved are engagement, suspense, and understanding of the antagonist. Though Paul recognizes that Annie is ‘dangerously crazy,’ the reader and Paul fail to know Annie’s true criminal background and motive. The aforementioned was due to the suppressing point of view throughout the narrative. From the beginning, it is apparent that there is more to Annie: she is no longer a nurse based on her living conditions and she obviously stopped being a nurse for something she did. By releasing of information in a gradual manner, King succeeds at keeping the reader engaged. He is able to do this by connecting with the reader through the usage of pathos. During the first few chapters, we learn that Annie’s temper is on the edge. She does not like Paul’s manuscript and therefore persuades him to burn it. “He looked at Annie Wilkes and said, clearly but not loud: ‘Annie, please don’t make me do this.’ She held the matches immovably before him and said ‘You can do as you choose.’ So he burned the book” (King 42). During this event, we are able to feel sympathy for Paul, as we know how deeply he worked, connected, and loved his manuscript. Thus, keeping us engaged by wanting Paul to survive and escape Annie.

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