db post nr503 week 2 and 3.docx - HPV Human Papilloma Virus Human Papilloma Virus(HPV is a cervical infection that often presents as a condition of

db post nr503 week 2 and 3.docx - HPV Human Papilloma Virus...

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HPV: Human Papilloma Virus Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is a cervical infection that often presents as a condition of cervical cancer. It is a highly contagious sexually transmitted disease that is often spread from person to person without knowledge of it’s existence (Schub & Parks-Chapman, 2017). According to Gorroll & Mulley (2014), screening tools for HPV include endocervical swabbing as in a Pap smear usually every three (3) years for women beginning at the age of 21 years old. Additionally, prophylactic treatment with a vaccine called Gardasil is recommended starting between the age of eleven (11) and twelve (12) to both boys and girls. It is also recommended that men having sex with men (MSM) receive the vaccine as the virus can affect sexually active individuals in locations such as the nasal mucosa, anus, penis, cervix and vagina. Screening for HPV targets the female population due to the virus’ increased risk of causing cancer cells in the cervix. The age group targeted for screening is ages 21-65 years old ("Guide to Clinical," 2014). During a Pap smear, cells are collected from the cervix and cytology is conducted to assess for cell abnormalities. Another assessment can be done by using colposcopy to evaluate and treat the cervix by viewing and collecting biopsies of the cervix. For women who have regular check-ups with their gynecologists, analysis of cervical cells is often conducted in the age group previously mentioned. The test is reliable because of the evidence it produces that will either result in normal or abnormal cells resulted from the tests performed. Males are treated without any tests specifically for them to assess their risks initially. The Pap smear test is a gold standard for analysis of cervical abnormalities including contraction of the HPV virus (Gorroll & Mulley, 2014, p. 835). This test is one that I foresee will continue to be in use in the future and I will include in my future advanced practice. Reference Gorroll, A. H., & Mulley, A. G. (2014). Primary care medicine: Office evaluation and management of the adult patient (7th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (LWW). Guide to clinical preventive services: Cervical cancer. (2014). Retrieved November 7, 2019, from Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) website: guidelines/guide/section2a.html#Cervical Schub, T. B., & Parks-Chapman, J. R. B. (2017). Human Papillomavirus (HPV). CINAHL Nursing Guide. Retrieved from ? direct=true&db=nup&AN=T703077&site=eds-live&scope=site Vesco, K. K., Whitlock, E. P., Eder, M., Senger, C. A., Lutz, K., & Burda, B. U. (2014, January 16). Archived risk factors and other epidemiologic considerations for cervical cancer screening: A narrative
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review for the U.S. preventive services task force. Retrieved November 7, 2019, from U.S.
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