system_disorder_form-IBS.pdf - ACTIVE LEARNING TEMPLATE System Disorder Rachel Vance STUDENT NAME Irritable Bowel Syndrome 42 DISORDER\/DISEASE PROCESS

system_disorder_form-IBS.pdf - ACTIVE LEARNING TEMPLATE...

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Unformatted text preview: ACTIVE LEARNING TEMPLATE: System Disorder Rachel Vance STUDENT NAME______________________________________ Irritable Bowel Syndrome 42 DISORDER/DISEASE PROCESS___________________________________________________________ REVIEW MODULE CHAPTER__ch. __________ Alterations in Health (Diagnosis) Pathophysiology Related to Client Problem disorder characterized by chronic abdominal pain or discomfort and alteration of bowel patterns. Diarrhea or constipation may predominate, or they may alternate and has no organic cause Irritable bowel syndrome Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Dietary factor avoidance GI infections food intolerance stress management ASSESSMENT SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS Risk Factors Expected Findings -Men are more likely to have IBS than diarrhea -men are less likely to admit symptoms or seek treatment -men experience more interpersonal difficultues -affects women 2 to 2.5 times more often than men -women more likely to have IBS with constipation -women report more extraintestinal co-morbidities IBS w/constipation, IBS with diarrhea, IBS mixed, IBS unscrypted, Laboratory Tests IBS w/constipation, IBS w/diarrhea, IDS unscrypted, abdominal distention, nausea, flatulence, bloating, urgency, mucus in the stool, and sensation of incomplete evacuation. -fatigue, headache, sleep disturbance Diagnostic Procedures Tests to selectively rule out other disorders such as colorectal cancer, IBD, endometriosis, and malabsorption disorders History and physical examination Rome III criteria abdominal pain and/or discomfort at least 3 months that is associated with two or more of the following: abdominal distention, nausea, flatulence, bloating, urgency, mucus in the stool, and sensation of incomplete evacuation, fatigue, headache, and sleep disturbance rule out: colorectal cancer, IBD, endometriosis, and malabsorption disorders PATIENT-CENTERED CARE Nursing Care -individualized drug therapy and observation -diary of symptoms, diet, and episodes of stress to determine triggers -coping strategies -regular exercise -review foods that are high in FODMAPs and other foods relative to their symptoms Therapeutic Procedures No single therapy is effective -dealing with psychologic factors -family history -dietary changes -episodes of stress to help identify IBS triggers -cognitive behavioral therapy and stress management -coping mechanisms ACTIVE LEARNING TEMPLATES -stressors and dietary factors that cause exacerbation of IBS -Soley diagnosed on symptoms be aware of stressors and report symptoms -keep journal of diet, stool output, episodes to identify any factors Complications Medications INDIVIDUALIZED antispasmodic medications: hyoscyamine, dicyclomine -alosterone -Loperamide -Eluxadoline -lubiprostone -linaclotide -tricyclic antidepressants and SSRIs Client Education -education about regular exercise to reduce bloating, constipation, and symptoms of anxiety/depression -diary of symptoms, diet, and episodes of stress Interprofessional Care -manifestations are intermittent and usually report history of GI infections and food intolerances -exacerbation of IBS by stressors -acupuncture -hypnosis -therapy Therapeutic Procedure  A11 ...
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