14167f.pdf - NONRESIDENT TRAINING COURSE Naval Safety Supervisor NAVEDTRA 14167F Notice NETPDTC is no longer responsible for the content accuracy of the

14167f.pdf - NONRESIDENT TRAINING COURSE Naval Safety...

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Unformatted text preview: NONRESIDENT TRAINING COURSE Naval Safety Supervisor NAVEDTRA 14167F Notice: NETPDTC is no longer responsible for the content accuracy of the NRTCs. For content issues, contact the Naval Safety and Environmental Training Center, (757) 445-8778 x316 or DSN: 565-8778 x316 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. PREFACE About this course: This is a self-study course. By studying this course, you can improve your professional/military knowledge, as well as prepare for the Navywide advancement-in-rate examination. It contains subject matter about day-to-day occupational knowledge and skill requirements and includes text, tables, and illustrations to help you understand the information. An additional important feature of this course is its references to useful information to be found in other publications. The well-prepared Sailor will take the time to look up the additional information. History of the course: Jun 1993: Original edition released. Authored by LDCR Charlene D. Brassington, CWO Denise A. Denzin, and DSC Efrain C. Espiritu. Jul 2003: Administrative update released. Reviewed by ETC Mark Sanschargrin and MMC(SW/AW) Jay Yedrysek. Errata entered. No change in technical content. Jun 2007: Administrative update released. Reviewed by EMCS(SW) Jesus Maxilom, BMCM Delamotte and EMC Deinla. ________ Oct 2008: Administrative update released. Reviewed by BMCM(SW) George Delamotte and Mr. Dan Jaquez. Errata entered. No change in technical content. 0504-LP-108-5328 INSTRUCTIONS FOR TAKING THE COURSE To obtain credit for completion of this course you must enroll in the course within Navy e-Learning (NeL) and successfully complete each assignment by achieving a minimal passing score of 70 percent for each. Make sure you review learning objectives in the course, they state what you should be able to do after studying the material. Read each question carefully, then select the BEST answer. For convenience and future reference, the full PDF version of this course may be saved from the references section of course on NeL. You may choose to work on the course assignments off-line by this method, but must return to course on-line and submit assignment answers to obtain credit and have completion recorded. We value your feedback as it helps us deliver a better training product. If you have any suggestions, questions, or identified course problems during your review; please take the time to complete survey at the following link: ; name=EOC&Group=NRTC iv TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE 1. Development of the Navy Safety Program ........................................................................... 1-1 2. Safety Program Promotion and Attitudes.............................................................................. 2-1 3. Mishap Causes, Prevention, and Hazard Abatement ............................................................ 3-1 4. Mishap Investigation Fundamentals...................................................................................... 4-1 5. Navy Occupational Safety and Health Program Fundamentals ............................................ 5-1 6. Shore Safety .......................................................................................................................... 6-1 7. Afloat Safety ......................................................................................................................... 7-1 8. Naval Aviation Safety ........................................................................................................... 8-1 9. Explosives Safety .................................................................................................................. 9-1 10. Traffic Safety ...................................................................................................................... 10-1 11. Recreation, Athletics, and Home Safety ............................................................................. 11-1 APPENDIX I. References Used to Develop this NRTC................................................................................. AI-1 INDEX.........................................................................................................................................INDEX-1 ASSIGNMENT QUESTIONS follow Index. CHAPTER 1 DEVELOPMENT OF THE NAVY SAFETY PROGRAM We designed this training manual to help acquaint you with the Navy's safety and occupational health programs, their setup, management, and supervision. In addition to the Safety and Occupational Health (SOH) Program, we will discuss the Shore Safety Program, the Afloat Safety Program, the Aviation Safety Program, and your duties as a naval safety supervisor. We have provided the appropriate references for specific safety standards throughout this manual and various safety terms and acronyms. You will also find information on the following program elements: • • • • • • • • Safety program promotion and attitudes Mishap causes and prevention Mishap investigation and reporting Safety program evaluation SOH Program elements Traffic safety Explosives safety Athletic, recreation, & home safety programs In this chapter, we cover the history and development of the Navy Safety and Occupational Health Program and its current organization. We also describe the role of safety supervisors, their responsibilities, and the criteria for their selection as safety supervisors. 1929 Enlisted personnel on shore duty were included in safety programs. 1947 The Navy Department Safety Council was organized under the Director of Safety of the Office of Industrial Relations (OIR). Its original mission was to coordinate safety procedures and to provide communications between the bureau safety engineers and the technical staff of the OIR safety branch. In 1967, the council's mission was expanded to include the development and maintenance of the U.S. Navy Safety Precautions Manual, OPNAV 34P1. 1951 The transition from propeller to jet aircraft helped the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) to establish the Naval Aviation Safety Council. In 1955, the name was changed to the Naval Aviation Safety Center. 1963 The Navy was shaken by the sudden loss of the USS Thresher (SSN-593), in which 129 sailors were lost. The Navy convened a court of inquiry to examine the circumstances leading up to and surrounding the incident. The court's findings resulted in the creation of the Submarine Safety Program Its purpose was to impose high standards of quality control on submarine construction and operations. In 1964, the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) established the Submarine Safety Center at the submarine base in New London, Connecticut, to examine and coordinate all matters of submarine safety. HISTORY OF NAVY SAFETY PROGRAM As your employer, the Navy is obligated by law to provide you with a safe and healthy work environment. Shipboard life, shipyard industrial activities, and aviation maintenance areas, especially, are inherently dangerous. We must keep our crewmembers, as well as civilian workers, healthy and ready to perform their missions. 1966-1967- SECNAV tasked CNO with reviewing the entire Navy Safety Program after a series of fires, collisions, and other mishaps involving surface ships resulted in more than 200 deaths and $100 million in damages. On 3 May 1968, as a result of the CNO's findings, SECNAV established the Naval Safety Center. The Navy has conducted safety and occupational health programs for many years. Historically, general and off-duty safety has been an element of the overall Navy safety program managed by Navy line functions. The Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED) conducts the occupational health program element. The following is a brief listing of the milestones in the Navy's safety program: 1917 Safety engineers were assigned to each naval shipyard. 1922 Safety programs for civilian employees were introduced at all naval activities. 1-1 1970 The Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) of 1970 became law. 1973 The Commander, Naval Safety Center, was designated as the CNO's Safety Coordinator (N09F), reporting directly to the Vice Chief of Naval Operations. This designation made the Naval Safety Center's mission more specific and all encompassing. 1983 general DOD policy and procedures for carrying out the Occupational Safety and Health Act and its associated Executive order. Another prominent instruction is DOD Instruction 6055.1, Department of Defense Occupational Safety and Health Program. This instruction provides the guidance needed to carry out the basic occupational safety and health program elements specified in 29 CFR. It also provides for variances in equipment standards that are unique to the military. The first Navy Safety & Occupational Health Program Manual, OPNAVINST 5100.23 Series was implemented. Safety programs gained special prominence after passage of the Occupational Safety and Health Act on 31 December 1970. The primary thrust of the act was directed at the private-sector employer. However, section 19 of the act and several later Executive orders directed federal agencies to set up and maintain comprehensive and effective occupational safety and health programs. DOD Directive 1000.3 designates the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Installations and Environment) as the safety and occupational health official for the Department of the Navy. He or she establishes, maintains, and modifies safety and occupational health programs. These programs carry out the requirements of DOD policy issuances and provide protection for both civilian employees and military personnel. On 26 July 1971, Executive Order (EO) 11612, the Occupational Safety and Health Programs for Federal Employees, was signed. This EO stated that the federal government, as the nation's largest employer, has a special obligation to set an example for safe and healthful employment. In that regard, the head of each federal department and agency was directed to establish an occupational safety and health program. SECNAVINST 5100.10H, Department of the Navy Policy for Safety, Mishap Prevention and Occupational Health Programs, delegates the authority for the operational aspects of the SOH Program to the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO). The CNO's responsibility includes issuing directives to enact program policies and defining specific safety standards and criteria. Over the next 3 years, federal agencies made only moderate progress. Congress received considerable criticism for a perceived double standard in occupational safety and health requirements between the private sector and federal agencies. As a result, EO 11807 replaced EO 11612 in 1974. SAFETY POLICY The Navy's policy is to enhance operational readiness and mission accomplishment by establishing an aggressive occupational safety and health program. This program reduces occupational injuries, illnesses or deaths, and material loss or damage. It also maintains safe and healthy working conditions for personnel. The program addresses the elimination or control of hazards that can result in injury or death. The occupational health aspects concern the effects of long-term exposures to toxic chemicals and harmful physical agents (for example, noise, heat, and radiation). The occupational health aspects involve the monitoring and treatment of work-related injuries and illnesses as well. This new order more clearly defined the scope, requirements, and responsibilities of federal agency programs. In addition, EO 11807 tasked the Secretary of Labor to issue guidelines designed to help federal agencies in establishing their programs. These "guidelines" were issued on 9 October 1974 as Title 29, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1960 (29 CFR 1960), Safety and Health Provisions for Federal Employees. Some critics were still not satisfied by the actions described above. Several federal agencies questioned the regulatory authority of the Department of the Labor guidelines (29 CFR 1960). On 26 February 1980, EO 12196, Occupational Safety and Health programs for Federal Employees, superseded EO 11807. In addition, the Department of Labor guidelines (29 CFR 1960) were revised on 21 October 1980. They were reissued as Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs. Each safety program, whether it concerns safety afloat, ashore, or in aviation, uses the chain of command to carry out the program. Safety programs apply to all military and civilian personnel (including off-duty military personnel). In addition to personnel, the program also applies to material afloat and ashore, on and off naval installations. The program requires Navy dependents and all other civilian personnel while embarked in naval ships or aircraft or while on naval shore installations to follow program directives. The CNO is responsible for implementing the safety and occupational health programs. The largest of these programs is the SOH Program. The SOH Program addresses the maintenance of safe and healthful conditions in the workplace or the During the past 10 years, the Department of Defense (DOD) has issued many directives and instructions to carry out the federal guidance outlined in the above paragraphs. Prominent among those directives and instructions is the Safety and Occupational Health Policy for the Department of Defense, DOD Directive 1000.3. This directive outlines 1-2 occupational environment. It applies to all Navy civilian and military personnel and operations ashore or afloat. OPNAVINST 5100.23 Series, Navy Safety and Occupational Health Program Manual, is the basic SOH document used to carry out the program. It refers to both afloat and shore commands. However, many unique and specific situations are associated with forces afloat as well as the aviation community. For that reason, the SOH information for forces afloat was separated into the Navy Safety and Occupational Health Program Manual for Forces Afloat, OPNAVINST 5100.19 Series, and directs forces afloat to use OPNAVINST 5100.19 Series for specific safety standards. OPNAVINST 3750.6R, The Naval Aviation Safety Program, is the reference for safety within the aviation community. These instructions are discussed in later chapters. prescribed safe operating procedures. Human error is cited as the most frequent cause of Navy mishaps. How do we keep personnel and working conditions as safe as possible? We include safety rules in our everyday workplace. One purpose of safety rules is to remind people of the inherent dangers of their work. Your job as a safety supervisor will require you to identify hazards and apply appropriate or required safety rules. Training personnel to observe safety precautions helps them avoid preventable mishaps, maintain a safe work environment, and conduct mishap-free operations. Operating procedures and work methods that include mishap prevention keep personnel from being needlessly exposed to injury or occupational health hazards. An effective safety program depends on worker cooperation and supervisor involvement SAFETY IN TODAY'S MODERN NAVY THE NAVAL SAFETY CENTER OBJECTIVE: The objective of the safety program is to enhance operational readiness and mission accomplishment by establishing aggressive safety and occupational health programs that will reduce injuries, illness, or death and material losses or damage and maintain safe and healthy working conditions for Navy civilian and military personnel. OPNAVINST 3120.32C, Standard Organization and Regulations of the U.S. Navy The Navy recognized the need for centralized management of all safety efforts many years ago. A single command to deal with all Navy safety ashore and afloat evolved from the original Naval Aviation Safety Center. With the passage of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) in 1970, increased emphasis on shore and shipboard safety demanded expansion and increased awareness. Before we go any further, let us define some terms you will see throughout this chapter and book. We define safety as freedom from danger, risk, or injury. An unplanned event or a series of events that results in injury, death, or material damage is a mishap. A hazard is an unsafe or a dangerous condition that may exist before a mishap occurs. We measure a hazard according to its severity and probability of creating a mishap. Commander, Naval Safety Center (COMNAVSAFECEN), advises and assists the CNO in promoting, monitoring, and evaluating the Department of the Navy safety program. The commander advises and assists the CNO in determining safety program goals and policies. COMNAVSAFECEN also has the responsibility of developing procedural guides and preparing directives to support and achieve program goals and policies. The overall objective of the SOH Program is mishap prevention. If a mishap occurs, we provide for investigation of that mishap to prevent recurrence. Mishap prevention involves identifying a hazard; evaluating the hazard; and correcting, controlling, or eliminating that hazard. Training is a critical element of mishap prevention. Safety supervisors play a critical role in mishap prevention and hazard awareness and identification. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE NAVAL SAFETY CENTER The Naval Safety Center, located in Norfolk, Virginia, provides staff support to the CNO in executing the Navy safety program. The Safety Center also provides staff support to the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Logistics), N4. The staff support helps N4 carry out its overall Navy safety and occupational health coordination responsibilities. The Safety Center supports the Naval Inspector General and the President of the Board of Inspection and Survey. Most mishaps are preventable. However, through ignorance or misunderstanding, many people have the common belief that mishaps are the inevitable result of unchangeable circumstances or fate. That belief is untrue because it fails to consider the basic law of "cause and effect" to which mishaps are subject. Thus, mishaps do not occur without a cause. Few mishaps are the result of material failure or malfunction; most mishaps are the direct result of some deviation from As directed, the Naval Safety Center assists N4 in preparing and maintaining basic safety program manuals. The Safety Center does not issue Navy wide safety directives. However, when requested, the staff helps the appropriate offices, commands, or agencies prepare general or specific safety-related operating 1-3 instructions. It also conducts safety surveys of the naval operating forces and shore commands as requested by the CNO. • Approach-, the Naval Aviation Safety Review, is published bimonthly for the professional benefit of all levels of naval aviation. It contains articles, commentaries, and short features about mishap prevention as well as articles about flight operations. • Mec- , the Naval Aviation Maintenance Safety Review, is published quarterly for the naval aviation maintenance community. • Sea&Shore, is published quarterly, combines our two award-winning magazines, Ashore and Fathom • Safetyline- the Naval Safety Journal, presents information available on various shore safety Unless otherwise directed, the Safety Center's responsibilities do not include safety related to nuclear propulsion and nuclear weapons. The Naval Safety Center receives and analyzes all mishap and injury reports submitted by aviation, ship, submarine, and shore commands. The staff indexes this information by phase of operation, material failure, personnel action, or cause factors. It then incorporates the information into the mechanized data bank, through which it can retrieve the mishap and injury records of any specific incident. In that way, the Naval Safety Center can monitor mishap trends and pinpoint areas requiring corrective action. Additionally, the Naval Safety Center maintains operational or exposure data such as the Individual Flight Activity Report and the Diving Log. It uses data from those documen...
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