CL20Lec26TermEndofAntiquity

CL20Lec26TermEndofAntiquity - The End of Antiquity The...

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The End of Antiquity The decline of Rome was the natural and inevitable effect of immoderate greatness. Prosperity ripened the principle of decay; the causes of destruction multiplied with the extent of conquest; and as soon as time or accident had removed the artificial supports, the stupendous fabric yielded to the pressure of its own weight. The story of its ruin is simple and obvious; and instead of inquiring why the Roman Empire was destroyed, we should rather be surprised that it had subsisted so long. Edward Gibbon (1737-1794) The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776-1788, six volumes) history is a product of its age, the Enlightenment of the 18th century like Livy, Gibbon wrote history as a moralist examined Christianity as a social and cultural phenomenon The Stupendous Fabric: Before the Fall Developments of Empire (1) central government of Rome: professional, institutionalized, and moderately efficient (2) extension of citizenship (3) demarcation of provinces (armies on frontiers; distinction between Roman/non-Roman)
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CL20Lec26TermEndofAntiquity - The End of Antiquity The...

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