CL20Lec23TermSlaveryRome

CL20Lec23TermSlaveryRome - Slavery in Rome preliminaries on...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Slavery in Rome preliminaries on slavery second paragraph of Declaration of Independence abolitionism in the late eighteenth century, a peaceful or violent end to slavery accepted institution in almost every society of ancient Mediterranean world types of ancient evidence literary texts, legal document, legal codes, burial inscriptions, papyri, and archaeology Seneca Letter 47 purchase of slaves (Oxyrhynchus papyrus and Wax Tablet in London) origins of slavery institution of slavery develops in close conjunction with, not in opposition to, the establishment of individual liberties and rights of citizenship (demarcation between free and slave, citizen and non-citizen) Rome as slave economy after wars of conquest in the east, great influx of slaves in second century B.C.E. in Augustan era, slaves perhaps made up about one third of population of Italy (according to some estimates, about two million of six million people) ownership of slave as mark of social status; examples of numbers of slaves
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

CL20Lec23TermSlaveryRome - Slavery in Rome preliminaries on...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online