POSC 120 Term Paper

POSC 120 Term Paper - Are We Queer Yet? A Comparative...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Are We Queer Yet? A Comparative Analysis of Gay Rights within Britain, France, and South Africa Joseph Dombrosky ID: 7120932967 Fall, 2007 POSC 120, Sanasarian TA: Matt Jones Over the past few decades, countries around the world have witnessed dramatic change in the politics concerning discrimination based on sexual orientation as well as gay rights. For most, these developments are relatively new, only emerging within the last century. Some of these
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Dombrosky 2 countries have historical precedent in abolishment of such discrimination, while others have just granted these protections within the last ten to fifteen years. France, for instance, became the first country to decriminalize homosexual activity in 1791 with the adoption of a penal code calling for sexual privacy. 1 But South Africa, a third world nation, was the first to include decriminalization in its constitution. 2 Britain continued its tradition of gradualism, slowly enacting legislation that expanded human rights for the gay and lesbian community. The differences and similarities between these countries bring to light a more important implication for understanding political change; one that can be explained by the comparative theory of state- society relations. Within all three, decriminalization of homosexual activity and the ensuing expansion of gay rights centered on state-driven policies, society’s response, and the resulting dynamic relationship between the two entities. France has a history of having incredibly volatile politics. This is no different for the human rights of homosexuals. As mentioned above, France became the first country to decriminalize homosexual activity directly following the French Revolution in the late 1700s. At first glance this may seem a significant success for the gay community. When taking a closer look, it is seen that the penal code that made this possible did so by providing a blanket policy concerning privacy rights. Thus, while it decriminalized homosexual acts, it did so without explicit legal wording. This policy of human rights liberation was continued with the Napoleonic Code of 1810, but it is documented that homosexuals still suffered persecution, especially under 1 Blasius, Mark, and Shane Phelan, eds. We Are Everywhere: A Historical Sourcebook of Gay and Lesbian Politics . New York, NY: Routledge, 1997. p. 35 2 Stychin , Carl F. "Constituting Sexuality: The Struggle for Sexual Orientation in the South African Bill of Rights." Journal of Law and Society 23 .4 (Dec. 1 1996): 455-483, 3 Dec. 2007 <http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0263323X %28199612%2923%3A4%3C455 %3ACSTSFS%3E2.0.CO%3B2-T>.
Background image of page 2
Dombrosky 3 the Vichy regime. 3 “Contact between the authorities and gays was absolutely one-sided: the authorities initiated every interaction on the basis of repression.” 4 In the mid-twentieth century, the gay community began to organize itself into various interest groups, which were used as mediums to begin the campaign of gay rights in political life under the Fifth Republic. 4
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/02/2008 for the course POSC 120 taught by Professor Sanasarian during the Fall '07 term at USC.

Page1 / 11

POSC 120 Term Paper - Are We Queer Yet? A Comparative...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online