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Unformatted text preview: Instructor’s Manual and Test Bank Your College Experience: Strategies for Success Two-Year College Edition John N. Gardner University of South Carolina, Columbia and John N. Gardner Institute for Excellence in Undergraduate Education Betsy O. Barefoot John N. Gardner Institute for Excellence in Undergraduate Education Negar Farakish Provost/Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of American Honors Union County College, New Jersey Instructor’s Manual authored by Edesa Scarborough University of Tampa Test Bank authored by Gabriel Adona San Diego Mesa College Using YouTube to Teach with Your College Experience authored by Chris Gurrie University of Tampa Bedford/St. Martin’s 01_GAR_9025_FM_i_liii.indd i Boston New York 25/11/14 11:27 AM Copyright © 2015, 2013, 2011, 2010, by Bedford/St. Martin’s All rights reserved. Manufactured in the United States of America. 9 f 8 e 7 d 6 c 5 b 4 a For information, write: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 75 Arlington Street, Boston, MA 02116 (617-399-4000) ISBN 978-1-4576-9025-9 Instructors who have adopted Your College Experience, Two-Year College Edition, as a textbook for a course are authorized to duplicate portions of this manual for their students. 01_GAR_9025_FM_i_liii.indd ii 25/11/14 11:27 AM C ontents Part I Introduction to the First-Year Seminar Introduction The Link between First-Year Seminars and High-Impact Practices A Research-Based Rationale for Offering First-Year Seminars Your Role as a First-Year Seminar Instructor in Promoting Student Retention Utilizing Peer Leaders in the First-Year Seminar Classroom Creating a Course Syllabus Final Projects for the First-Year Seminar Part II Chapter Teaching Resources Overview of Teaching Resources Using YouTube to Teach with Your College Experience Teaching with the Features in Your College Experience 1 Making the Transition to College and Planning Your Academic Journey Chapter Teaching Objectives Timing of Chapter Coverage About This Chapter Suggested Outline Expanded Lesson Plan STEP 1 Lecture Launchers and Icebreakers STEP 2 Classroom Activities STEP 3 Review STEP 4 Test STEP 5 Preview for Next Class viii ix xiii xv xviii xx xxxvi xli xliii li 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 9 11 17 2 Managing Time, Energy, and Money Chapter Teaching Objectives 18 3 Discovering How You Learn Chapter Teaching Objectives 41 Timing of Chapter Coverage About This Chapter Suggested Outline Expanded Lesson Plan STEP 1 Lecture Launchers and Icebreakers STEP 2 Classroom Activities STEP 3 Review STEP 4 Test STEP 5 Preview for Next Class Timing of Chapter Coverage 18 18 18 19 20 20 21 31 34 40 41 41 iii 01_GAR_9025_FM_i_liii.indd iii 25/11/14 11:27 AM iv Contents About This Chapter Suggested Outline Expanded Lesson Plan STEP 1 Lecture Launchers and Icebreakers STEP 2 Classroom Activities STEP 3 Review STEP 4 Test STEP 5 Preview for Next Class 41 42 43 43 43 52 54 60 4 Getting the Most Out of Class Chapter Teaching Objectives 61 5 Reading to Learn from College Textbooks Chapter Teaching Objectives 77 6 Studying, Understanding, and Remembering Chapter Teaching Objectives 94 Timing of Chapter Coverage About This Chapter Suggested Outline Expanded Lesson Plan STEP 1 Lecture Launchers and Icebreakers STEP 2 Classroom Activities STEP 3 Review STEP 4 Test STEP 5 Preview for Next Class Timing of Chapter Coverage About This Chapter Suggested Outline Expanded Lesson Plan STEP 1 Lecture Launchers and Icebreakers STEP 2 Classroom Activities STEP 3 Review STEP 4 Test STEP 5 Preview for Next Class Timing of Chapter Coverage About This Chapter Suggested Outline Expanded Lesson Plan STEP 1 Lecture Launchers and Icebreakers STEP 2 Classroom Activities STEP 3 Review STEP 4 Test STEP 5 Preview for Next Class 01_GAR_9025_FM_i_liii.indd iv 61 61 61 62 62 62 63 69 71 76 77 77 77 78 78 78 78 85 88 93 94 94 94 94 95 95 95 102 104 110 25/11/14 11:27 AM Contents v 7 Taking Tests Successfully Chapter Teaching Objectives 111 8 Information Literacy Chapter Teaching Objectives 130 9 Writing and Speaking Chapter Teaching Objectives 148 10 Thinking Critically Chapter Teaching Objectives 167 Timing of Chapter Coverage About This Chapter Suggested Outline Expanded Lesson Plan STEP 1 Lecture Launchers and Icebreakers STEP 2 Classroom Activities STEP 3 Review STEP 4 Test STEP 5 Preview for Next Class Timing of Chapter Coverage About This Chapter Suggested Outline Expanded Lesson Plan STEP 1 Lecture Launchers and Icebreakers STEP 2 Classroom Activities STEP 3 Review STEP 4 Test STEP 5 Preview for Next Class Timing of Chapter Coverage About This Chapter Suggested Outline Expanded Lesson Plan STEP 1 Lecture Launchers and Icebreakers STEP 2 Classroom Activities STEP 3 Review STEP 4 Test STEP 5 Preview for Next Class Timing of Chapter Coverage About This Chapter Suggested Outline Expanded Lesson Plan STEP 1 Lecture Launchers and Icebreakers STEP 2 Classroom Activities STEP 3 Review 01_GAR_9025_FM_i_liii.indd v 111 111 111 112 112 112 113 120 123 129 130 130 130 131 131 131 132 139 141 147 148 148 148 148 149 149 149 157 160 166 167 167 167 169 170 170 170 178 25/11/14 11:27 AM vi Contents STEP 4 STEP 5 Test Preview for Next Class 180 186 11 Managing Your Health, Emotions, and Relationships in a Diverse World Chapter Teaching Objectives 187 12 Making the Right Career Choice Chapter Teaching Objectives 213 Part III Midterm and Final Exams 231 Timing of Chapter Coverage About This Chapter Suggested Outline Expanded Lesson Plan STEP 1 Lecture Launchers and Icebreakers STEP 2 Classroom Activities STEP 3 Review STEP 4 Test STEP 5 Preview for Next Class Timing of Chapter Coverage About This Chapter Suggested Outline Expanded Lesson Plan STEP 1 Lecture Launchers and Icebreakers STEP 2 Classroom Activities STEP 3 Review STEP 4 Test 187 187 187 190 191 191 192 203 206 212 213 213 213 214 214 214 215 222 225 Midterm Exam 232 Final Exam 237 01_GAR_9025_FM_i_liii.indd vi 25/11/14 11:27 AM Part I Introduction to the First-Year Seminar 01_GAR_9025_FM_i_liii.indd vii 25/11/14 11:27 AM I ntroduction Welcome to the Instructor’s Manual and Test Bank for Gardner, Barefoot, and Farakish’s Your College Experience, Two-Year College Edition. The contributors who assisted in writing this manual have drawn from their expertise and experience in the classroom. The manual is divided into three parts: Part I includes articles and resources for the first-year seminar course. Four articles, written by John N. Gardner and Betsy O. Barefoot, offer background and context for the first-year seminar and your teaching practice. These articles are grounded in current research and will help you explain the history and value of the course to others. The articles are as follows: 1. 2. 3. 4. The Link between First-Year Seminars and High-Impact Practices A Research-Based Rationale for Offering First-Year Seminars Your Role as a First-Year Seminar Instructor in Promoting Student Retention Utilizing Peer Leaders in the First-Year Seminar Classroom Part I also includes helpful tips for creating a syllabus, with sample syllabi for a three-credit and a onecredit course, and suggestions for final projects which can be integrated into your course. Part II opens with an overview of the teaching resources in each chapter, a guide to teaching with YouTube, and a new article on how to leverage the features and resources available with your text in your course. Each chapter also includes a test bank with multiple-choice, true/false, short answer, and essay questions, which can be used for student practice or higher-stakes assessment. Part III contains test questions organized for use as midterm and/or final examinations. viii 01_GAR_9025_FM_i_liii.indd viii 25/11/14 11:27 AM The Link between First-Year Seminars and High-Impact Practices ix The Link between First-Year Seminars and High-Impact Practices Even though the first-year seminar has been a part of the American college curriculum since the 1880s, it is only in this century that the evidence of the course’s effectiveness has accumulated to the point where it has become “HIP” to offer such courses! This is because of the now highly respected research literature on the educational outcomes for students from what have become designated as “High-Impact Practices.” This emphasis on “HIPs” is due largely to the research of George Kuh, Chancellor’s Professor Emeritus of Higher Education at Indiana University, with dissemination in part by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter, 2008). High-impact practices refer to those interventions in undergraduate education that regardless of institutional type, or student characteristics, have been correlated with significant gains in increased student engagement and retention. The following is a list of high-impact practices. You will note immediately that first-year seminars (also commonly referred to as college success courses) alone constitute a high-impact practice. In addition, there are nine more such practices that can be incorporated into your college success course to enhance the course’s effectiveness and support institution-wide learning outcomes. What Are High-Impact Educational Practices? First-Year Seminars The phrase “first-year seminar” is often used interchangeably at many campuses with the concept “firstyear experience,” which John Gardner coined as both a descriptive and motivational phrase in the early 1980s. These courses are also often referred to as “college success” or “student success” courses. While there are many different types of these courses, they all share a common goal: to assist students with the transition to higher education and to improve student success. More importantly, these courses also serve as the delivery vehicles for other “high-impact practices” as seen on the list below. Common Intellectual Experiences It has been demonstrated that a common, shared set of engaging and memorable experiences as students make the transition into college increases the likelihood of student success and retention. All new students have certain common experiences, but the question needs to be, are these the experiences we might want them to have — experiences that will be most supportive of their becoming engaged and transformed by higher education? Specifically, what else do we want to provide as a common experience besides orientation, advising, registration, and so forth? In particular, what kinds of common intellectual experiences might be most impactful? One of the oldest forms of common experience has been the common “core” curriculum. In addition, we have been gradually reintroducing former staples of the American college experience such as a “common reading,” usually completed prior to the beginning of the fall term, orientation, and first-year seminar courses. As a first-year seminar instructor, you are one member of a larger community of educators working very intentionally to provide your new students with a powerful set of collective, transformative experiences. Learning Communities Learning communities are another exceptionally well-validated part of the college curriculum that have been shown to have many positive impacts on students and instructors. A learning community connects at least two to as many as five courses, taken by the same small group of first-year students (around 5 to 15). 01_GAR_9025_FM_i_liii.indd ix 25/11/14 11:27 AM x Introduction These courses may or may not be linked by a common intellectual theme and/or be team-taught. They also may include co-curricular experiences and activities provided by student affairs professionals. Such courses may also be offered for students having a common living experience in a residence hall. The learning community structure is the ideal structure for combining a first-year seminar with another college course. In this case, the seminar would teach the academic skills necessary for success in the paired course, the latter being the laboratory for the practice and application of the skills being taught in your course. There is compelling evidence that students in college success courses report higher levels of engagement when the course is linked with at least one other course in a learning community. Writing-Intensive Courses We believe that the college success course should be a “writing intensive” course, and the myriad of reflection and writing exercises and activities provided in your text reflect that belief. Writing is a foundational academic, career, and life skill. The growth of technology has changed the way in which our students write due to the use of e-mail, texting, and so forth. This also means that students are actually writing more than ever. We would even argue that the first-year seminar should be as writing-intensive as the first-year writing/composition course. It is important to stress that writing is not just for English 101, but is a skill that transfers to other courses as well as life. To make the most of several high- impact practices, try integrating an introductory writing course and the first-year seminar in a learning community. Collaborative Assignments and Projects Collaborative assignments and projects are not only an important way of learning in college, they prepare students for work they will likely experience in their profession after college. The college success course is an ideal space for the use of collaborative assignments and projects. You will note that in our text and instructor’s manual, we have provided many suggestions and illustrations for a myriad of collaborative activities. We believe this is especially important in this course because it aids in the all-important process of students bonding with each other and with their school. Use of collaborative assignments and projects help students meet new people, form new friendships, and get help and advice from each other, and it introduces them to human differences and diversity with which they will need to engage for the rest of their lives. In this course, these collaborative activities ideally should be used both in the formal class meetings and outside the class as homework. Undergraduate Research Undergraduate research refers to the practice of having undergraduate students work directly with faculty on research activities and projects. Based on the success of this strategy, especially at flagship research universities like the University of Michigan, this practice has become widespread throughout higher education. This results in providing a powerful structure for faculty/student relationships and student-to-student relationships as they work together on a research question. Undergraduate research introduces college students to the research practices of higher education faculty, illustrates the differences between high school and postsecondary research, and increases both student engagement and learning. This course is an excellent opportunity to illustrate to students why a major purpose of higher education is to conduct research, and why professionals in all fields must have basic skills in collecting, evaluating, and communicating information. The foundations of these important life skills can and should be taught in such a course. The first-year seminar can also be the setting in which students are introduced to undergraduate research opportunities across the institution. 01_GAR_9025_FM_i_liii.indd x 25/11/14 11:27 AM The Link between First-Year Seminars and High-Impact Practices xi Diversity/Global Learning The college success course is a very appropriate space for reading, writing, discussion, and research on topics that engage students with diverse worldviews, cultures, and viewpoints different from themselves. A major part of the adjustment to college comes about in increasing comfort levels with both intellectual and personal diversity, the forms of which are much less likely to have been experienced in high school. Our text also addresses this area intentionally and offers activities and tips for teaching diversity to your students. Service Learning, Community-Based Learning Service learning is by now a quarter-century old, well-established pedagogy whereby students are required in certain courses to engage in campus or community service, which is evaluated as part of the overall course requirements. This pedagogy always includes a reflection component whereby students are required to think, write, and speak about what they have learned in the service work and how they may apply this to other course content and to their developing adult lives. Service learning incorporates elements of a college learning experience that have been shown to correlate with retention, such as outside-of-class faculty/ student and student-to-student interaction and faculty/student affairs partnerships in support of mutual learning objectives. In many first-year seminar courses a minimum hour requirement of service learning is incorporated in the course, for either individual student service work or group service projects. Internships While internships are most frequently embedded as a degree requirement or option within the students’ majors for upper-class students, this concept can still be connected to a first-year college success course. Because of the value of internships for helping students to clarify and confirm career plans and for helping students to actually secure permanent employment with the employers for whom they intern, this strategy needs to be introduced into whatever is done in your college success course to acquaint new students with the career-planning resources at your institution. The first-year seminar course should help students develop a concrete plan for their entire undergraduate experience, including planning for internships. Capstone Courses and Projects The practice of incorporating a “capstone” academic experience in the last part of the undergraduate curriculum is a time-tested concept dating to the Middle Ages. Capstones typically enable students to demonstrate mastery of content and processes that are central to their major and to demonstrate some unique research they have done and related subject matter mastery. Capstones also invite students to reflect on what they have learned in college and especially in their major, and to report publicly those insights. While obviously the first-year seminar is not for graduating students and is not designed to demonstrate mastery of core concepts within a major, nevertheless this course can still be used for students to gain practice in researching a topic of interest and demonstrating the new knowledge they have acquired. In addition, college success courses should regularly offer students opportunities for reflection on what is happening to them early in college and how they are learning and adjusting and growing from these early experiences. Thus some of the quintessential components of a capstone experience as a high-impact practice should also be incorporated into a beginning college experience in the first-year seminar course. To that end, we have provided several possible capstone and final project ideas in this manual to encourage students to reflect on their growth over the course of the first-year seminar and extend their learning into the rest of their academic careers. 01_GAR_9025_FM_i_liii.indd xi 25/11/14 11:27 AM xii Introduction Conclusion This relatively new emphasis on high-impact practices provides a solid argument for the value of the college success course, as it lends credibility to the argument that it is valuable for beginning college students to take such a course. In addition, the clear framework for high-impact practices provides a guiding structure for the kinds of processes that should be incorporated into a college success course. We are confident that the incorporation of high-impact practices into your college success course will increase student engagement during your co...
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