Sigmund Freud - Moses and Monotheism-Vintage (1955).pdf - 00 64560 co co OSMANIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARY ^2 f8W Accession Author Ms'VLjf.J < This book should

Sigmund Freud - Moses and Monotheism-Vintage (1955).pdf -...

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00 64560 co co
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OSMANIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARY ^2- f8W\ Accession Author Ms&'VLjf .J ._ -. .. , * ' <** This book should be returned on or before the date last marked below,
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MOSES AND MONOTHEISM
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MOSES AND MONOTHEISM SIGMUND FREUD TRANSLATED FROM THE GERMAN BY KATHERINE JONES PUBLISHED BY THE HOGARTH PRESS AND THE INSTITUTE OF PSYCHO-ANALYSIS '939
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First published 1 939 PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN BY THE GARDEN CITY PRESS LIMITED AT LETGHWORTH, HERTFORDSHIRE
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TRANSLATOR'S NOTE PARTS I and II of this book were published in German in Imago in 1937; Part III has not previously appeared in print. I am indebted to Mr. James Strachey and Mr. Wilfred Trotter for kindly reading through this translation and for making a number of valuable suggestions. I have also had the advantage of consulting the author on some doubtful points. K.J: '
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CONTENTS PART I PAGE MOSES AN EGYPTIAN - - - - n PART II IF MOSES WAS AN EGYPTIAN 29 PART III MOSES, HIS PEOPLE AND MONOTHEISTIC RELIGION 89 PREFATORY NOTES 89 SECTION I: 1. The Historical Premisses 95 2. Latency Period and Tradition - 107 3. The Analogy - - - 116 4. Application - - - 129 5. Difficulties - - - - 148
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8 CONTENTS PAGE SECTION II: 1. Summary - - - - - 163 2. The People of Israel - - 166 3. The Great Man - - - 169 4. The Progress in Spirituality - 176 5 . Renunciation versus Gratification 182 6. The Truth in Religion - 193 7. The Return of the Repressed - 197 8. The Historical Truth - - - 201 9. The Historical Development - 207 GLOSSARY 217 INDEX - - - 219
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PART I MOSES AN EGYPTIAN
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Part I MOSES AN EGYPTIAN To deny a people the man whom it praises as the greatest of its sons is not a deed to be under- taken light-heartedly especially by one belong- ing to that people. No consideration, however, will move rne to set aside truth in favour of supposed national interests. Moreover, the elucidation of the mere facts of the problem may be expected to deepen our insight into the situation with which they are concerned. The man Moses, the liberator of his people, who gave them their religion and their laws, belonged to an age so remote that the preliminary question arises whether he was an historical person or a legendary figure. If he lived, his time was the thirteenth or fourteenth century B.C.; we have no word of him but from the Holy Books and the written traditions of the Jews. Although the decision lacks final historical certainty, the great majority of historians have expressed the opinion that Moses did live and that the exodus from Egypt, led by him, did in fact take place.
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12 MOSES AND MONOTHEISM It has been maintained with good reason that the later history of Israel could not be understood if this were not admitted. Science to-day has become much more cautious and deals much more leniently with tradition than it did in the early days of historical investigation. What first attracts our interest in the person of Moses is his name, which is written Mosche in Hebrew.
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