Lesson 20 FINAL ESSAY.docx - Final Essay Good Copy Hamartia in Three Great Works of Literature by Taelara Reynolds In the major texts Agamemnon by

Lesson 20 FINAL ESSAY.docx - Final Essay Good Copy Hamartia...

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Final Essay Good Copy Hamartia in Three Great Works of Literature by Taelara Reynolds In the major texts, Agamemnon by Aeschylus , Hamlet by Shakespeare, and “ The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock ” by T.S. Eliot, the common element of hamartia in each character provokes a feeling of pity in the audience and creates an undeniable consequence, leading to the protagonist’s downfall. This essay examines how the hamartia in all three characters is evident through their actions and decisions. The situations they find themselves in create feelings of pity and the audience can begin to predict certain outcomes. The final body paragraph states how each work of literature concludes with definitive consequences for all, defining how hamartia is the tragic flaw that leads to the hero’s demise. Similarities and differences are observed throughout the body paragraphs to compare and contrast the three works. Pity and hamartia are intertwined as the protagonist’s tragic flaws blind them from foreseeing the outcome of their situations. The following body paragraph reveals each character’s hamartia, intriguing the audience. In Agamemnon , the play begins with Agamemnon accidentally killing a deer in a sacred grove that belongs to the goddess, Artemis. As his first act of hubris in the play, she punishes him by interfering with the winds so that his fleet cannot sail to Troy. It is later revealed that in order to appease Artemis, Agamemnon must sacrifice his eldest daughter to allow the fleet a clear pathway. At first, Agamemnon refuses to kill his daughter, but after being pressured by the commanders to move on with the war, he agrees. His daughter, Iphigenia, was one of Agamemnon’s children that loved him the most. In conversation, she innocently tells her father to immediately see her when he returns from war, oblivious to his current agenda, “IPHIGENIA: When you have returned home from Troy, you will have to come straight to me.
Final Essay Good Copy AGAMEMNON: Before I leave, I have a sacrifice I must perform. IPHIGENIA: Of course. The gods need their sacrifices. AGAMEMNON: You will attend. You will stand right next to the purifying water. IPHIGENIA: Will we dance round the altar? AGAMEMNON: How happy you are in your innocence. But give me a kiss and your hand, then go inside. / Soon, you will embark on a trip that will take you far away from me. Oh, to touch your cheek, your hair, to hold you close . . . how unfair it is that you have to suffer for Helen and for Troy. But enough, I must stop my tears. Go inside” (Aesch.,100-354). Although Agamemnon did have a decision, he values winning the war over his own family. He talks tenderly of his daughter, stating how innocent and happy she is and understands how it feels to hold her close. Agamemnon is completely aware that it is unfair for her to be sacrificed for the battle, but states that he must not shed any more tears as his main goal is to win the war. His hamartia is revealed as an initial act of hubris against the Gods as the audience begins to feel pity for Iphigenia’s undeserving death and for Agamemnon’s loss of a daughter. In addition to this, he

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