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Banalewicz 1 The World of Westeros Norms Changing Females: For the Worse or the Better? Jessica Banalewicz November 17, 2019 Professor Goodmann Paper 2 University of Miami ENG 382 The World of Westeros Norms Changing Females: For the Worse or The Better?
Banalewicz 2 The World of Westeros Norms Changing Females: For the Worse or the Better? In George R.R. Martin’s Game of Thrones , there is a role in society that one must fill. Men are noble, honorable, and brave. They must know how to fight, how to aim and shoot a bow and arrow. Women are assets to men. They are there to satisfy their needs, to cook and clean for the household, to perfect their sewing skills, to be at their men’s beck and call. Two significant women that fall under the pressure of society are Sansa and Arya Stark. One shows the confidence to break free from the norm, while one shows submission to the standard. Sansa Stark is a submissive character. Her urgency lies in becoming a lady, her needlework resulting in only exceptional work, and betroth a prince that will lead to a king. She is the definition of what every woman “should” grow up to be. She is the role model of women in Westeros. Sansa is traditionally feminine. Her interests include music, poetry, and singing. Sansa’s goal is to become like the idols of romantic tales equaling fitting into her norm. “Sansa must wed Joffrey, that is clear now…” (Martin 60). Her kindness is taken for weakness, and this shows in her very first chapter. When Sansa and Prince Joffrey are walking through the camp, they come across an odd noise. When Joffrey decides to approach the sound, he and Sansa see Arya and the butcher’s boy, Mycah, play fighting as knights with wooden sticks. Joffrey decides to frighten the boy by stating that if he wanted to be a knight, he would fight him right then and there with any weapon. The boy grows in fear. He tells Joffrey that he was asked to practice with Arya. Sansa looks at Arya for confirmation. “Sansa had only to glance at Arya and see the flush on her sister’s face to know the boy was telling the truth, but Joffrey was in no mood to listen.” (Martin 143). She does not stand up for what she thinks is right. She does not want to embarrass or disrespect the Prince because that is what society calls for. Sansa keeps quiet in a lot of

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