PHI105.T3_FallacyStudyGuide .docx - Fallacy Study Guide(Flash Cards Create flash cards to help you study for the fallacy quiz in topic 4 by filling in a

PHI105.T3_FallacyStudyGuide .docx - Fallacy Study...

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Fallacy Study Guide (Flash Cards) Create flash cards to help you study for the fallacy quiz in topic 4 by filling in a definition and an example on each fallacy card below. After you have submitted this completed document to your instructor for a grade, you can print it out, cut out each fallacy card, and fold them in half to study with. Appeal to Ignorance {Fold Here} --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- An appeal to ignorance uses lack of evidence (for or against) as the basis of the argument. For example, if something can’t be disproven, it must be true! Example: No one has ever proven that XXXX is true Therefore XXXX is false. You have a family member who has a terminal disease. You hear of a possible new cure being offered in another country. You contact the group promoting this cure and ask if it works. They say, "No one has ever shown that it doesn't work, so of course it works! (Grand Canyon University 2012) Hasty Generalization {Fold Here} --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- A hasty generalization occurs 'when a conclusion is drawn from a sample that is too small or selective to assume with any confidence that it represents the subject accurately' Example: A guy from a trailer park with trash everywhere is a drug attic. Therefore, any guy who lives in a trailer park is trailer trash and a drug attic. (Grand Canyon University 2012)
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Either/Or {Fold Here} --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- An either/or fallacy does not acknowledge that opposing claims could both be true, that grey areas may exist between the two alternatives, or that other possibilities exist. Example: Saying that either this or that are the best food to have at a BBQ. Making a statement such as this limits the choices to only two, when in reality there are many more choices. At times there are only two choices, and the either/or fallacy does not apply. For example, a woman is either pregnant or not pregnant, or a field goal is either good or not good. (Grand Canyon University 2012) Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc {Fold Here} --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc at times is one of the most persuasive fallacies. Assuming that because B follows A, A must have caused B. This is an easy fallacy to assume because this could happen, but we cannot always assume this happens. Some things just happen due to coincidence and the two things really having nothing to do with each other.
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