CS 205A class_19 notes

Scientific Computing

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 19 Tuesday, December 4, 2007 Supplementary Reading: Osher and Fedkiw, § 18.3, § 23.1 1 Heat Equation The Heat Equation ∂T ∂t = ∇· ( k ∇ T ) is our model parabolic equation, and arises in several physical simulation applications. 1. We are commonly given initial values for T as T ( x,t = 0) = T ( x ) and boundary conditions for t > 0. 2. In the case where the spatial component of T is one-dimensional, we have the equation T t = ( kT x ) x . 3. Parabolic equations approach a steady state . For example, in the heat equation we can take T t = 0, which gives ∇ · ( k ∇ T ) = 0, the Laplace equation. Derivation Starting from conservation of mass, momentum and energy one can derive ρe t + ρ ~ V · ∇ e + p ∇ · ~ V = ∇ · ( k ∇ T ) (1) where k : thermal conductivity T : temperature e : internal energy/unit mass ρe : internal energy/unit volume 1 Ideal Material and Divergence-Free We first make the ideal material assumption, ie. e and T satisfy the relationship...
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This note was uploaded on 01/29/2008 for the course CS 205A taught by Professor Fedkiw during the Fall '07 term at Stanford.

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CS 205A class_19 notes - Lecture 19 Tuesday, December 4,...

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