Chapter 3 print version

Chapter 3 print version - Chapter 3: Gender Development,...

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Chapter 3: Gender Development, Gender Roles, and Gender Identity Gender and Sex 0. Sex 0. biological aspects of being male or female Evidence for Nature and Nurture 1. 1 in 2000 births involves a baby with ambiguous genitals or reproductive structures that are both male and female in physiology Evidence for Nature and Nurture 2. Dr. John Money, Johns Hopkins University 0. sexologist, 1. gender social (not biological); Evidence for Nature and Nurture 3. Bruce: Canadian man born as a mentally and biologically healthy boy, 4. His penis was inadvertently destroyed during circumcision. Evidence for Nature and Nurture 5. Brenda: was sexually reassigned and raised as a girl Evidence for Nature and Nurture 6. David: as an adult resumed a male gender role Gender Stereotyping 7. What is a stereotype? Prenatal Development Prenatal Development 8. Most cells contain 46 chromosomes 2. 23 from each parent (gamete) Prenatal Development Prenatal Development
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9. Fertilization 3. Haploid egg + Haploid sperm = Diploid zygote Prenatal Development: X and Y Make the Difference 10. Sex is determined at conception 11. Development of typical female or male sexual characteristics 12. Some developmental variations Sexual Differentiation in the Womb 13. Gestation: 9 months 14. 4-6 weeks: gonads begin to develop and sexual differentiation starts 1-2 weeks later 15. Sex chromosomes control development of: 4. internal sex organs 5. external sex organs 6. the embryo’s hormonal environment 7. the brain’s sexual differentiation Atypical Sexual Differentiation: Not Always Just X and Y 16. Atypical sexual differentiation can occur with irregularities in: 8. Sex chromosomes 9. Sex hormones 10. Maternal hormone exposure Sex Chromosome Disorders 17. Over 70 sex chromosome abnormalities 18. Extra or missing sex chromosomes 19. 3 most common: 11. Klinefelter’s syndrome (XXY) 12. Turner’s syndrome (XO) 13. XYY/XXX Klinefelter’s Syndrome 20. XXY – egg contained an extra X 21. 1/700 live male births 22. Develops male genitalia, but not fully 23. Tall, feminized body 24. Low testosterone levels; low in sexual desires 25. Gynecomastia 26. Infertile
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Klinefelter’s Syndrome Klinefelter’s Syndrome: Gynecomastia
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2008 for the course HD 2314 taught by Professor Krallen during the Fall '08 term at Virginia Tech.

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Chapter 3 print version - Chapter 3: Gender Development,...

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