Amy Tan is an American author of Chinese origin who mainly explores the elements of mother.docx - Amy Tan is an American author of Chinese origin who

Amy Tan is an American author of Chinese origin who mainly explores the elements of mother.docx

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Amy Tan is an American author of Chinese origin who mainly explores the elements of mother-daughter relationships in her works. She has produced several works of fiction, as well as non-fiction, the best known of which is ‘The Joy Luck Club’, which revolves around the lives of four mothers and their four daughters. The book won many prizes and has been translated into several languages. Many of her other novels such as ‘The Kitchen God’s Wife’ and ‘The Bonesetter’s Daughter’ have also become bestsellers. A critically acclaimed author today, she had always dreamed of making a career in writing. When she was a student, her parents expected her to become a neurosurgeon but she defied them by joining an English Major course. After working as a technical writer for some time, she took to writing fiction. Her first novel, ‘The Joy Luck Club’ became a New York Times bestseller and won her many accolades and prizes. The book has also been adapted into a successful movie for which she co-wrote the screenplay. She went on to author other novels which were also well received by the readers and critics alike. She also writes books for children. One of her children’s books, ‘Sagwa, the Chinese Siamese Cat’ was adapted into a television program. Amy Tan, whose Chinese name, An-mei, means "blessing from America," was born in 1952 in Oakland, California, the middle child and only daughter of John and Daisy Tan, who came to America from China in the late 1940s. Besides Amy, the Tans also had two sons — Peter, born in 1950, and John, born in 1954. The family moved nearly every year, living in Oakland, Fresno, Berkeley, and San Francisco before settling in Santa Clara, California. Although John and Daisy rarely socialized with their neighbors, Amy and her brothers ignored their parents' objections and tried hard to fit into American society. "They wanted us to have American circumstances and Chinese character," Tan said in an interview with Elaine Woo in the Los Angeles Times (March 12, 1989).

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