badminton-module.docx - History and Development Games with a shuttlecock are widely believed to have originated in ancient Greece about 2000 years ago

badminton-module.docx - History and Development Games with...

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History and Development - Games with a shuttlecock are widely believed to have originated in ancient Greece , about 2000 years ago where it was played as a child’s game called battledore and shuttlecock . - The game of 'Battledore and Shuttlecock' was frequently played at Badminton House, the home of the Duke of Beaufort in Gloucestershire, England. A net was added to the classic game, and it was so popular here that it became known as "the Badminton game". - In the 1860s, the Duke of Beaufort entertained soldiers at his “Badminton House.” - The Duke’s non-military friends preferred to call Poona (because it was played in the city of Pune, India by British soldiers). - The modern day title of 'badminton' first came into use in 1873 - In 1877, the first badminton club in the world, Bath Badminton Club, formally wrote out the badminton rules. - In 1893 the Badminton Association of England (Badminton England) was established and published the first set of official rules and regulations. - The first badminton competition was held in 1898 in Guildford. The following year saw the first 'All England Championships' - this is still run annually today. - Badminton was finally granted Olympic status in 1992. 1) Men’s singles 2) Women’s Singles 3) Men’s doubles 4) Women’s doubles 5) Mixed doubles (men and women play) - Badminton worldwide is now governed by the Badminton World Federation (BWF (Formerly IBF)). The popularity of badminton has continued to grow and there are now more than 150 members of the BWF. Rules and Regulations A badminton match is played to the best of three games. A coin toss determines first serve or choice of side. The object of a badminton game is to hit the badminton shuttlecock over the badminton net and onto the ground within bounds on your opponent's side of the court. A rally can also be lost by hitting the shuttle into the badminton net, out of bounds, before it crosses the net to your side, or if it strikes your clothing or body rather than your badminton racket .

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