07C ATMO 201-201 Nasiri - ATMO 201 Atmospheric Science...

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Unformatted text preview: ATMO 201: Atmospheric Science Honors Section 201 Fall 2007 Instructor: Prof. S. Nasiri, 903A Bller 0&M Bldg, 845-8076, snasiIi©tamu.edu. Course web page: http:l/ —201.html Class time and location: 08:00 - 09: 15 TR, 302 CSA Building. Office hours: 11:00 — 1:00 Tuesday; other times by appointment. Required Text: Understanding Weather and Climate, 4th ed. by Aguado and Burt. Prerequisites: Minimum GPR of 3.4 for Catalog 126 or lower; minimum GPR of 3.5 for Catalog 127 or greater. Course Objectives: By the end of the course you should be able to: 0 Identify and explain observed weather phenomena and the physical processes responsible for them. 0 Describe the structure, composition, and dynamics of the atmosphere so that you can ex- plain the weather to others. 0 Understand current meteorological and climatological events and apply that knowledge to your decision making. 0 Formulate a scientific question, determine how to answer it, and present the question, the process, and the answer to your peers. Grading policy: Your course grade will be determined based on the following scale: 90-100%, A; 808996, B; 70-79%, C; 60—69%, D; less than 60%, F. The final grade distribution may be ad- justed at the discretion of the instructor. Exam 1 25% Exam 2 25% Final Exam (Exam 3) 25% III-class and Homework Assignments 10% Research Project 15% Exams: There will be two semester exams and one final exam. Exams will be a combination of multiple choice, short answer, and short essay questions. Exams missed for reasons other than a university excused absence will be given a grade of zero. Make-up exams will only be given for university excused absences and will be essay format. All material presented in the lectures and the reading material will be testable. The final exam is scheduled for December 10, 2007 from 1:00 - 3:00 pm and will cover t0pics since the last exam. While the exams are not expressly cu- mulative, some questions may apply older material to the newer concepts. Exam questions must be returned to the instructor when the exam is turned in. 070 Assignments: In—class and homework assignments are 10% of your grade. These assignments are designed to make you think critically about a question. You will receive full credit for the assignment if critical thinking about the problem is demonstrated; otherwise zero credit will be received. 011 average, no more than a total of two in—class and homework assignments will be given per week. In some cases, in class assignments will be done in pairs - only one paper need be turned in if this is specified. Homework must always be your individual effort. In class assignments are due when the instructor calls for them to be handed in. Homework as— signments are due at the beginning of the following class. Homework and in class assignments must be handed in on an 8.5” x 11” sheet of paper and must be typed or legibly handwritten in blue or black ink. Late assignments will not be accepted. Research Project: A research question will be formulated, researched, and presented to the class. Research projects will be based on your interests and will be done with a partner. More detailed information regarding projects will handed out. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Policy Statement The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Department of Student Life, Services for Students with Disabilities in Room Bl 18 of Cain Hall, or call 845—1637. ' Copyright and Plagiarism Policy: All materials used in this class are copyrighted. These ma- terials include but are not limited to syllabi, quizzes, exams, lab problems, in-class materials, re- view sheets, and additional problem sets. Because these materials are copyrighted, you do not have the right to copy the handouts, unless permission is expressly granted. As commonly defined, plagiarism consists of passing off as one’s own the ideas, words, writings, etc., which belongto another. In accordance with this definition, you are committing plagiarism if you copy the work of another person and turn it in as your own, even if you should have the permission of that person. Plagiarism is one of the worst academic sins, for the plagiarist destroys the trust among colleagues without which research cannot be safely communicated. If you have any questions regarding plagiarism, please consult the latest issue of the Texas A&M University Student Rules, Definitions of Academic Misconduct: ' http:l/ Aggie Honor Code: An Aggie does not lie, cheat, or steal or tolerate those who do. Upon ac- cepting admission to Texas A&M University, a student immediately assumes a commitment to uphold the Honor Code, to accept responsibility for learning, and to follow the philosophy and rules of the Honor System. Students may be required to state their commitment on examinations, research papers, and other academic work. Ignorance of the rules does not exclude any member of the TAMU community from the requirements or the processes of the Honor System. For addi— tional information please visit: http:llwww.tamu.edulaggiehonor/ Tentative“ Schedule for ATMO 201, Section 201, Fall 2007 (TR 8:00-9:15) Topic Syllabus, Composition of the atmosphere Structure of the atmosphere and weather basics 14-27 Energy and radiation Causes of the earth’s seasons 43—61 Energy balance - Energy balance Temperature - Atmospheric pressure and the equation of state Forces and Wind Projects — Exam 1 (Chapters 1-4) — 10/2 5 Atmospheric moisture 123-134 10/4 5 134-155 Cloud development and forms 156- 171 Cloud development and forms 171-187 O -...,___ p—i id 10/16 Meteorological satellite observations — 10/18 7188—209 H g b.) _— Exam 2 (Chapters 5-8, Satellites, and Texas Climate) OD \I-u... 03b.) GUI |—-I p—l "'--. H m ———_ 475—509 ——— 12/10 Monday, Final Exam from 1:00-3:00pm -- (Chapters 9—13, 16) * We reserve the right to modify this schedule. If major changes are to be made during the semester, an updated version of the schedule will be provided. ...
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