Coming of Age in The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time (1) - Gomez 1 Juan Gomez Professor Everet J.Turner Counsel 040B-C04 Coming of

Coming of Age in The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time (1)

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Gomez 1 Juan Gomez Professor Everet J.Turner Counsel 040B-C04 11/17/19 Coming of Age in The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon is the story of Christopher John Francis Boone’s adventures as told by him. The protagonist, Christopher, wrote the book as a murder mystery, describing his investigation of the killing of Mrs. Shears’ dog, Wellington. However, as he tells his story, the reader gets a clearer picture of Christopher’s life, learning about his mother and all of the secrets present within his family. Boone has some mental and behavior problems. Throughout the text, he has to struggle with his own issues as he investigates the murder of the poodle and searches for his mother. Through The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, Mark Haddon presents the themes of coming of age and bravery. Christopher John Francis Boone from Swindon is a unique, yet genuine, honest, and innocent individual. The protagonist clearly has a mental and behavioral disorder, which cause him to have many eccentricities. Some of his behavioral problems include “not talking to people for a long time, not eating or drinking anything for a long time, not liking being touched, screaming when [he is] angry or confused, and not liking yellow things or brown things” (46). When the police officer tried to remove his watch “[he] screamed” (13), a behavior uncharacteristic of a teenager. He “does not like hugging people” (16), even his own parents. It makes him feel uneasy and uncomfortable. These behaviors are not normal for a fifteen-year-old boy. In addition, he never responds to statements, only questions. He “nd[s] people confusing” (14) because he has trouble reading people’s facial expressions to understand their emotions. When he does “not know what someone is saying, [he asks] them what they mean or [he walks] away” (3), and odd, but normal behavior to him. He has trouble picking up and understanding his father’s emotions from time to time, tending to only understand himself. When Christopher’s father was “sitting on the sofa watching snooker on the television and drinking scotch, there were tears coming out of his eyes” (21). The protagonist cannot comprehend his father’s distress after picking up his son from the police station. In the end, Christopher decides “to leave him alone because when [he] is sad [he] wants to be left alone” (21). In addition, Boone makes the odd comment that one might think privately to himself, but would never be said aloud. For example,

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