08A ATMO 463-900 Schade - ATMO 463-900 Air Pollution...

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Unformatted text preview: ATMO 463-900 - Air Pollution Meteorology In Spring 2008, this class is taught Via the Blackboard Vista 4.0 system at TAMU. You need to be a registered student for the class to have access to the class material. Contact the instructor with inquiries. Below is the class syllabus for general information. Class meets MWF 01:50 .... 02:40 pm, 203 Eller 0&M Building Instructor: Dr. Gunnar Schade Office: 1104B Eller 0&M Building E-rnail: [email protected] Phone: 845-0633 Office hours: MWF 9:00 — 10:00 a.m. 'Prereguisites: ATMO 363 and ATMO 335 recommended; internet/e-mail access crucial Text: There is no required text. I will provide you with any necessary reading material. However, lwill be “testing” a possible future textbook. Course Outline: 1. Introduction, Sources of air pollution 2 weeks 2. Atmospheric transformation of air pollution 2 weeks 3. Transport of air pollution 2 weeks 4. Sinks of air pollution 1 week 5. Modeling air pollution 1 week 6. Measurement and monitoring of air pollution 1-2 weeks 7. Control of air pollution 1-2 weeks 8. Class project/Excursion 2 weeks 03/? Class Project: The class project will be an attempt to collectively write about an air pollution topic with the goal to turn it into a manuscript for publication. The goal of each student is to contribute to that scientific manuscript in draft form by the end of the semester. The instructor along with any interested students shall then submit a final version to an appropriate journal within 2 months thereafter. For example, each student may be assigned a particular pollutant for in—depth study. In 2007, students researched sources, mitigations, and sinks of mercury in Texas. Your contribution to the paper should show that you know how to read scientific publications on advanced topics and that you understand and are able to synthesize that knowledge. Writing guidelines for the manuscript will be based on the American Meteorological Society's guide for scientific manuscripts. Besides the instructor, each student will be ' assigned two different anonymous peers out of the class who provide regular feedback. In general, more than two thirds of course work will be writing related and shall be individual or shared in small groups. All students are required to turn in a satisfactory chapter for the manuscript. Failure to do so will result in an incomplete or an F for the course. More information about writing-intensive courses is available at http:lluwc.tamu.edu/faculty/wcourselguidingprincipals.html Excursion . There will be at least one 1~day excursion to Houston to visit an air quality monitoring station. Time permitting, there shall be one class to prepare you for the excursion and one recapitulation class after the excursion. The class excursion was the highlight of 2007, including attending of the AWMA Texas Coast chapter with free buffet lunch and a visit of one of Houston’s most advanced air monitoring stations. Grading: Writing assignments 8X 5% = 40% Quizzes ' 3x10% = 30% Draft chapter 30% Total 100% Typical Grading Scale: 100-90: A; 89-75: B; 74-60: C; 60-50: D; less than 50: F Course Webpage / Writing assignments The course web page, managed via Vista 4, will be used for posting of class material and as a portal for your submissions, and (anonymous) feedback from your peers and instructor. The course is an official “W” course. Sessions on writing, example papers showing layout and scientific writing style, and writing feedback will be given in class and through the webpage throughout the semester. Writing ,_ assignments will be split into collaborative (30%) and individual parts (70%). You need to have access to an internet capable PC and have an e-mail address. Details will be discussed in class. University Writing Center: In order to assist you in writing, the University Writing Center (UWC), located in Evans Library 1.2M, ofl‘ers help at any stage of the writing process including brainstorming, researching, drcy‘fing, documenting revising, and more; no writing concern is too large or too small. These consultations are highly recommended but are not required While the UW C consultants will not proofiead or edit your papers, they will help you improve your proofi‘eading and editing skills. Dr you visit the UWC, take a copy of your writing assignment, a hard copy of your drafi or any notes you may have, as well as any material you need help with. To find out more about UW C services or to schedule an appointment, call 45 8-1 4 55, visit the web page at uwc.tamu.edu, or stop by in person. Plagiarism: As commonly defined, plagiarism consists of passing of as one’s own the ideas, words, writings, etc., which belong to another. In accordance with this definition, you are committing plagiarism if you copy the work of another person and turn it in as your own, even if you should have the permission of that person. Plagiarism is one of the worst academic sins, for the plagiarist destroys the trust among colleagues without which research cannot be safely communicated flattp:// ). Accommodations: .. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. 13’ you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Department of Student Life, Services for Students with Disabilities in Room 126 of the Koldus Building. The phone number is 845-163 7. i | | | l | E ...
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