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Running head: MORAL INJURY 1 Moral Injury Perspectives Student’s Name Institution’s Name
MORAL INJURY 2 Self-Reflection Everyone develops consciousness as they grow up. At some point, we have some deeply rooted beliefs regarding what is right and wrong, in which things are good and bad. These beliefs and values depend on the experiences we have had in our lives since our moral code is shaped and reinforced by our experiences, any adverse stimuli can inflict moral injury. Moral injury refers to the damage done to an individual’s moral values and conscience after perceiving a moral offense. As a result of this, emotional guilt, shame and in some cases betrayal, anger, and moral confusion can follow in profound proportions. Moral anguish has been witnessed as a psychological consequence of witnessing or participating in very violent events. The impact of extreme moral injury can adversely affect the mental health of an individual. In many cases, people who have been exposed to traumatic experiences are diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Moral injury can be experienced as a result of one’s own actions and experience, or the actions of others. At an individual level, this occurs when something terrible happens to other people as a result of our actions, or the violent manner in which it occurred and scarred the individual. While this is common in military personnel, every single person is susceptible to moral anguish depending on their perception of what is right and wrong in society. To break it down, moral injury can be viewed from three different perspectives based on what aspects of an individual’s life it impacts. The first channel of moral anguish is psychological distress. According to Brett Litz, moral injury can be described as “perpetrating, failing to prevent, bearing witness to, or learning about acts that transgress deeply held moral beliefs and expectations.” (Litz, et al., 2009) Upon
MORAL INJURY 3 witnessing or participating in a gruesome offense against other human beings, it impacts the individual’s mental model of the world. If for example, one fails to help someone in dire need and the failure results in their death. One of the consequences would be profound guilt and

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