Response4.ck.docx - Cherie Knighton Catholic...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 5 pages.

Cherie Knighton Catholic Counter-Reformation One of the pivotal times in Christian History was the Catholic Counter-Reformation which was initiated in response to the Protestant Reformation (anti-Catholic European Movement) beginning with the Council of Trent and ending with the European Wars of Religion in 1648. The Council of Trent was an official meeting to clarify and to defend their faith within the Roman Catholic Church in response to the Protestant Reformation. It unleashed the abrupt end to relative unity that had existed in the previous years of Western Christendom. It began in Germany but spread throughout Europe in response to the corruption and administrative abuse in the church. The criticisms, mainly worldly attitudes from the Renaissance Popes and papacy, influenced the Counter-Reformation. Additionally, Saint John of the Cross and St. Teresa of Avila promoted such actions and were influential to the development of mystical traditions . In fact, Pope Paul III, during his papacy, assembled the Council of Trent in 1545, lasting until 1563. The Council of Trent addressed contentious issues such as corrupt bishops and priests, indulgences, and financial abuses. During this problematic time, the Catholic teachings were under attack by Protestants, who undermined tradition because they did not adhere to the Catholic Church's practices. In turn, many Catholics fell away and turned Protestant largely due to Martin Luther and his 95 Theses . Martin Luther chastised Catholics for their beliefs and thought faith alone could not be earned by doing good deeds as the Catholic teachings directed. As mentioned in our class discussion, Instructor Jesse Lee had asked, “Did the Catholic church fundamentally change because of the Protestant Reformation and Counter-Reformation?” The answer was: “No, the catholic Church did not change.” Even though the Catholic Church was being criticized and attacked they stood by their teachings, and the Reform deepened issues but did not unify believers in any sense of the imagination.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture