11.01 - 11.01 Intro Basically in the history of USA people would say that America is the land of opportunity for everyone as if everyone worked

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11.01 Intro: Basically in the history of USA people would say that America is the land of opportunity for everyone as if everyone worked hard they can move up any time… --Indian removal --slavery… Was it true? I. Industrial Beginnings: ( general definition of industrial revolution is the rise of production of nonagricultural / manufactured goods achieved especially through the more intensive use and more intensive supervision of labor. US WAS NOT AN INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY IN 1860 INCLUDING NORTH! BUT FIRST real development had begun to happen ) a. Samuel Slater i. English mechanic who worked with Richard Archive (leading mechanic in England) who had invented the water frame-a means of conveying power from a moving stream to run machinery to mechanize the process of spinning raw wool into yarn. This would be attached to a building which was a called a mill. As the gearing got more elaborate you could run several at once and the machine tenders would all work at the same pace b/c the pace is dictated by the machines ii. Memorized waterframe, snuck out of England. Got backing from Rhode Island and established the waterframe in Rhode Island… Got its first technology by industrial espionage…. iii. Profits came from the intense use of cheap labor…in these textile factories were women and children b/c you can pay them less also part b/c spinning was always done by women in the home but we are just changing the location to factories iv. Who families would go to work in mills b/c of the crisis of new England agriculture—there would be an implementation of discipline v. Mills had this kind of power:-- automatically social and political power came along with Industrial production vi. But more famous were Lowell Mass. Mills b. Lowell i. Henry Cabot Lowell—a tourist in England going through English mills and then would make detailed drawings of what he saw— machines copied literally but labor system was new. ii. Idea: rather than using whole families recruit young single women from across New England from farm families who would find the wages attractive and who found independence attractive and live in a prospective city. How do you persuade families to let
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daughters move to Lowell?--> Factories built boarding houses that would be highly supervised: curfews, compulsory church attendance, no drinking, selling the idea that it was a moral and safe place iii. Sold labor as a temporary thing: a stage in lifestyle—a way a young woman could earn some money before she gets married or gets some formal education but most women sent their money home to their families iv. By 1820’s, Lowell women themselves described working at textile mills as an experience… They published a magazine, wrote letters home, and indeed in comparison to English mill towns…Lowell at first looked really good…a stream of tourists came to look at Lowell including Dickins who had written about all bad industrialization—Lowell put up a good front—a way USA could escape European Industrial trajectory
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2008 for the course HISTORY 7a taught by Professor Einhorn during the Fall '08 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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11.01 - 11.01 Intro Basically in the history of USA people would say that America is the land of opportunity for everyone as if everyone worked

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