Chapter 3 - Chapter 3: Genetic and Evolutionary Foundations...

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Chapter 3: Genetic and Evolutionary Foundations of Behavior pg. 66-94 Natural Selection and its Implications for Psychology Darwin’s natural selection is selective breeding in nature; genes that improve an individual’s ability to survive and reproduce increase from generation to generation Mutations are errors that occasionally occur during DNA replication that changes genes around; this and sexual reproduction shuffles genes Lamarck’s idea of inheritance of acquired characteristics that changes in an individual stem from practice or experience Evolutionary rate depends on rate of environmental change Evolution has no foresight and only operates because of random genetic changes Functionalism serves to explain behavior in terms of what it accomplishes for the behaving individual (why do giraffes have long necks) o Ultimate explanations – explanations at the evolutionary level; role the behavior plays in the animal’s survival and reproduction o Proximate explanations
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2008 for the course PSYCH 1 taught by Professor Shimamura during the Fall '08 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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Chapter 3 - Chapter 3: Genetic and Evolutionary Foundations...

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