The Academy and the Rococo

The Academy and the Rococo - The Academy and the Rococo...

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The Academy and the Rococo
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Nicolas Poussin, Et in Arcadia Ego (c. 1635) oil on canvas, 34” x 48”
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Nicolas Poussin, Landscape with Saint John on Patmos (1640) oil on canvas, 40” x 53 ½”
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Charles Le Brun, Les Reines de Perse aux pieds d’Alexandre (c. 1663) oil on canvas, c. 120 1/2” x 72 7/8”
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Charles Le Brun, Alexander’s Entry into Babylon (1664) oil on canvas, 14’ 9 1/8” x 23’ 2 1/3”
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The rigorous control of the academy included plans to standardize and then regulate artistic practice. These illustrations show Le Brun’s expression of the passions, which artists were expected to follow closely, especially in istoria .
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As art patronage grew and competition between artists increased, some painters tried to establish themselves as intellectuals (on par with philosophers and poets), while others recognized their strengths and began to specialize in certain types of paintings. Both of these trends contributed to the “hierarchy of genres” that emerged during the 17 th century. Artists ranked types of paintings according to their prestige: History painting ( istoria ) – stories from scripture and classical texts meant to “delight and instruct” Portraiture portrayal of one or more individuals emphasized “likeness,” which meant character as much as physical appearance often included animals and servants Landscape representations of places real or imagined with or without humans, animals and buildings/ruins Genre images of ordinary, often lower-class people engaged in everyday activities Still-Life ( nature morte ) carefully-detailed renderings of inanimate objects that include themes of mortality, mortality, materialism and imperialism
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History Painting – meant to instruct the viewer in “how to live a good life and die a good death” by portraying important moral and spiritual lessons from classical and biblical narratives. In such cases as Altdorfer’s Battle of Issus and Velázquez’s
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The Academy and the Rococo - The Academy and the Rococo...

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