scan0037 - 5-20 These contact types are defined as...

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Unformatted text preview: 5-20 These contact types are defined as follows (from the ANSYS Simulation Help files. Search on ‘Contact’ then select information on the ‘Type’ ofcontact): . Type: The differences in the contact settings determine how the contacting bodies can move relative to one another. This is the most common setting and has the most impact on what other settings are available. Most of these types only apply immense-giant” ' ' it Scope” Scoping Method .Geometry Selection ntact EZ‘Faces l Faces ,. rget :ContactBod' 5 Target Bodies Definition [is . . fScone Mode i i 53 ihavior " " No Separation . .. , WFT‘ICtIDI'IlESS l § Suppressed Rough l dyancé'd ‘ Frictional , satisfies" " {N rnalStianess rais'a’sa“csaaiiga“ "1 pdate Stiffness Never Program Controlled ; ihinbaliRegioni W H Apr-odrarniControlled Figure 5-30 Types of contact modeling available. to contact regions made up of faces only. Bonded: This is the default configuration for contact regions. If contact regions are bonded, then no sliding or separation between faces or edges is allowed. Think of the region as glued. This type of contact allows for a linear solution since the contact length/area will not change during the application of the load. If contact is determined on the mathematical model, any gaps will be closed and any initial penetration will be ignored. No Separation: This contact setting is similar to the bonded case. It only applies to regions of faces. Separation of faces in contact is not allowed, but small amounts of frictionless sliding can occur along contact faces. F rictionless: This setting models standard unilateral contact; that is, normal pressure equals zero if separation occurs. It only applies to regions of faces. Thus gaps can form in the model between bodies depending on the loading. This solution is nonlinear because the area of contact may change as the load is applied. A zero coefficient of friction is assumed, thus allowing free sliding. The model should be well constrained when using this contact setting. Weak springs are added to the assembly to help stabilize the model in order to achieve a reasonable solution. WWWWW MWMW.W.VMM~_w./wammmw WWW” “Wm“.mmamuwv avawmwwawmw Simulation II !‘ a ...
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