Materials and Structures Lab

Materials and Structures Lab - Matthew Callesen Daniel...

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Matthew Callesen Daniel Roberts www.allstar.fiu.edu/AERO/Flow1.htm MAE 3183 Wednesday Section Experiment #5 Air Drag Force Date Performed: 9/20/06 Date Due: 9/27/06
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Abstract The purpose of this laboratory experiment was to determine the contributing factors to the drag coefficient of a fluid moving over a different rigid body, and compare them to published data. This was accomplished by placing four objects of known geometry in a wind tunnel: an airfoil, cylinder, sphere and square. The air velocity was incrementally increased, while the pressure drop, and air temperature and strain readings were recorded in a DAQ. It was found that the main contributing factors to drag force were the objects geometry, the velocity of the fluid, the fluid characteristics, and the surface of the object. It was also found that the ????????????insert results. This ??????? agreed with the published data. It was also found that the experiment could be improved by ?????????. Introduction When a force balance is conducted on a moving body, there are many factors that must be considered. The friction of the propelling medium, the mass of the object, and the opposition by mechanical means are just a few common factors that need are typically accounted for. One additional force that must be considered, particularly at higher velocities is the drag force that the body encounters. The effects of the immersed fluid on the rigid body can be considerable, and whether it is a person walking briskly down the street, or a rocket propelled car at challenging he land speed record, drag force is evident. The minimization of drag has become an area of great interest recently because reducing the drag on an object reduces the power required to continue movement. The energy consumed to overcome drag forces is essentially wasted. Given that most transportation methods require fuel consumption, the reduction of drag allows for increased gas mileage in vehicles. Therefore engineers attempt to minimize drag by good design practices and extensive laboratory testing prior to manufacturing. The purpose of this experiment is introducing engineering students to processes required to determine the drag coefficient of several geometries. The drag force on an object is not in itself a measurable quantity. It must be derived using measurable quantities, and empirical relationships. Drag is caused by two key sources. The first is the friction between the fluid and the body passing through it, and the second is the pressure differential on the body. While all
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objects experience drag, the amount of drag force each experiences varies greatly depending on several factors. In general the amount of force each body experiences is expressed in equation 1. 2
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This note was uploaded on 06/15/2009 for the course MAE 3183 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at UT Arlington.

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Materials and Structures Lab - Matthew Callesen Daniel...

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