airdrag_new - University of Texas at Arlington MAE 3183,...

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University of Texas at Arlington MAE 3183, Measurements II Laboratory Air Drag Force 1 Experiment #5 Air Drag Force
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University of Texas at Arlington MAE 3183, Measurements II Laboratory Air Drag Force 2 Introduction The effects of drag exist in everyone's life. Simply driving a car across town means that you have experienced drag. Your car engine must work a little harder to overcome the force present with drag and get you to your location on time. Just walking down the street as well will confront a person with drag. Although this drag is small and the speed that that you can walk is small, the effects still exist. Drag, or more specifically air drag, is a phenomenon that occurs as an object passes through a fluid. There are a few factors that determine the drag force that an object experiences. Some of the more obvious factors are shape, speed, fluid medium, and surface of the object. In some instances these factors are manipulated in order to either minimize or maximize drag. In other cases the drag forces must simply be known in order to design for other parameters possibly such as engine horsepower, structural strength, etc. Regardless of the need for finding the drag force, the need for an accurate calculation of this force persists. With this in mind, we experiment with shapes, speeds, and methods in order to draw insight on the ability to predict drag. In this experiment, we study the effect of shapes on drag at various Reynolds numbers and examine the validity to accurately predict drag using two different methods. Theory When a fluid flows around a stationary cylinder or when a cylinder moves through a stationary fluid, the fluid exerts a force on the cylinder called drag. The sources of this drag are: (a) friction between the fluid and the surface of the cylinder, and (b) a non-uniform pressure distribution. The cylinder in the fluid stream presents a certain area perpendicular to the direction of fluid motion. This is called the planform area of the cylinder (length x width) the fluid moves toward and is deflected around the
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airdrag_new - University of Texas at Arlington MAE 3183,...

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