lab2[1] - The University of Texas at Arlington Mechanical...

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The University of Texas at Arlington Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department Experiment Number 2 Viscous Flow Ronnie A. Mojzis Michael Blackmon MAE 3183 Section # 002 Date performed October 13, 2004 Due Date October 20, 2004
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ABSTRACT The main objective of experiment two “viscous flow” is to become familiar with the behavior of incompressible fluids and the relationship of this when flowing in a closed pipe. To make this experiment easier to understand, the fluid circuit system (Model 9009) was used. Using different system settings, mainly differential pressures, the team will determine the real inner diameter of the pipe used as on this experiment (pipe one). Water was allowed to flow at different flow rates using the differential pressure method, after the desired level of water was reached in the bucket, the weight of the fluid was recorded and the time it took was entered on the experiment log sheet. The temperature of the inlet water was constant thus, the density and the specific weight of the fluid did not changed. After the desired data was recorded and analyzed, the Reynolds number and the roughness friction factor was determined. Consecutively, a Moody diagram was generated to determine the true internal diameter of pipe number one. The nominal diameter of the pipe is 3/8” with a .430” inner diameter was found to be different. The analysis of the data gathered during the experiment revealed that the effective internal diameter of the pipe is .0358 ft or .419 +/-.01 in. As expected, the friction factor and the Reynolds number increased as the flow rate was increased. The values of these coefficients ranged from 1958 to 26561 and .0327 to.0024 respectively. INTRODUCTION The understanding of fluid motion on circular pipes is extremely important for every engineer. During our daily life we encounter several hydraulic systems that were analyzed by engineers to serve the public. Some of the systems are taken for granted and we don’t take in consideration the motion of the fluid. An example
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of a system were a fluid flows through a closed pipe is the city’s potable water system. Because of the large piping network underground, large pressure drops are found. This is why it is necessary to have boosting stations strategically located throughout the city to increase the water pressure so the customer can be satisfied. Other example is the processing of crude oil. After the crude is extracted from the ground it is necessary to pump it to holding stations or to refineries. Large pumps are needed to pump the fluids due to the energy losses created during the transport of the fluid for many miles. During this experiment, a simulation of a piping network was created using the
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lab2[1] - The University of Texas at Arlington Mechanical...

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