Syllabus%20HI440%20Summer%2009

Syllabus%20HI440%20Summer%2009 - "Genesee...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
“Genesee Scenery,” 1847, Thomas Cole, founder, Hudson Valley School
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
American Environmental History History 440-601 Summer 2009 North Carolina State University Professor Matthew Morse Booker Email: mmbooker@ncsu.edu Tel: 650 721-1588 Teaching Assistant - Rob Shapard Email: rpshapar@ncsu.edu Course website: http://vista.ncsu.edu Description This course is a history of the relationship between human beings and nature in the United States. We will explore the varied and changing relationship between Americans and the landscapes they inhabited. Focusing on the past two centuries, we will investigate how humans have used, viewed, and remade this land. Two central questions guide the class: What is environmental history? And, how does environmental history matter in American history? Students will be introduced to themes in American Environmental History, including: Native Americans and the environment; ecological changes following contact with European, African and Asian peoples, animals, and microbes; the impact of settlement, industrialization and urbanization; how new technologies permitted greater environmental modification; the rise of conservation and environmentalist movements in the twentieth century; environmental inequality; and the historical roots of today’s environmental problems. Objectives: This course fulfills requirements for 400-level History courses at NC State. Students will: understand and engage in the human experience through the interpretation of evidence from the past in its context; and become aware of the act of historical interpretation itself, through which historians use varieties of evidence to offer perspectives on the meaning of the past; and make academic arguments about history using reasons and evidence. Goals: This course has two basic themes. I argue that environmental history consists of both Material and Cognitive elements. “Material” refers to actual physical changes in the land, including changes caused by human activities. “Cognitive” refers to how individuals and societies saw themselves and nature and how those ideas led to environmental change. Cognitive and material components interact and influence each other. Having taken this class, students will be informed about their own pasts and better equipped for what one environmental historian calls “the peculiarly human task of living in nature while thinking ourselves outside it.” 2
Background image of page 2
Expectations: Education is a shared endeavor. I expect you to help create and maintain a respectful learning environment, even if that environment is virtual. A respectful learning environment includes the following: Respect each other. Every student should feel free to contribute her or his own opinion. There is a fine line between free speech and hate speech. The former is absolutely necessary to learning; the latter stifles it. If in doubt about the distinction, please consult with the instructor.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 8

Syllabus%20HI440%20Summer%2009 - "Genesee...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online