Female_Executives_in_Mexico_FINAL_FINAL

Female_Executives_in_Mexico_FINAL_FINAL - Case 9 Female...

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Case 9: Female Executives in International Business: How do Corporations Reverse the Myth “Many Nations are not ready to Accept Female Executives” Erika Cavazos Seo Choi David Malicoat Mike Ohikhuare Palka Patel Jeff Pollock 1
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Introduction The number of women in managerial positions is on the rise. As the U.S. diverges away from the traditional norms regarding women, individuals are becoming more accepting of the contemporary working female. Although the number of male executives outnumbers female executives, the U.S. and other countries are making progress. “In 2004, women made up 46 per cent of all U.S. labor force participants – up from 29.6 percent in 1950 – and held half of all managerial, professional, and related occupations in US companies, up from 36 percent in 1976 (US Department of Labor, 2005 )” (Linehan and Scullion 2). The need for females in the workforce is growing and therefore our decision to offer her the position as executive vice president in the company’s Mexican subsidiary is critical to the company. Background Although Mexico still has its “machismo” culture, it is becoming more accepting towards female leaders. With new laws that favor women’s rights, women are joining the political arena and pursuing higher education in the changing Mexican culture. The trend shows that Mexico will soon be as accepting of and have as many women in high positions as there are in the United States. In Mexico, “Some important companies have begun to implement diversity programs to prompt the hiring of women and promoting them to higher positions, and although this is happening in an isolated and exceptional manner, these programs got underway last year, for the first time in the country” (Zabludovsky 6). Mexico is advancing drastically in the number of female workers in the workforce and therefore, hiring a female executive would be an advantage to the company. There is still the stereotype of the Mexican man that expects his wife to be at home, receiving him with a cold beer and dinner. Although many women do stay home, more of them 2
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are going out into the workforce. They also want a cold beer after hard day’s work. Many women were working in agriculture. However many of them began to work in maquiladoras, and are now beginning to work in careers such as architecture, accounting, engineering, etc. Many of the bordering states have the same mind-set as the United States does. A group member has been to Tamaulipas, Nuevo Laredo numerous times since she was a toddler. She has noticed that men do respect women and women’s rights. The culture is similar to that of the United States. Women hold positions as managers, business women, entrepreneurs, architects, doctors, and lawyers. Universities still have more men than women attending but the number of women
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This note was uploaded on 06/16/2009 for the course BUSINESS 4444 taught by Professor Dr.dale during the Spring '09 term at University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson.

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Female_Executives_in_Mexico_FINAL_FINAL - Case 9 Female...

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