Lecture 6-Masonry Construction

Lecture 6-Masonry Construction - Lecture Six Masonry...

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Lecture Six Masonry Construction Patterns
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Masonry Construction Terminology Arch: An opening made of bricks or one or more stones. Arches can be used to allow much greater opening widths than are possible with lintels. 1) Round arches: were developed by the Romans (basically a semi-circle) 2) Peaked arches: were developed in Islamic architecture, and used also in the gothic context. 3) Flat arches: made form a large stone or stones, or bricks laid obliquely, with a keystone
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Lintel-a flat arch: A horizontal device used to support the wall over an opening (usually a doorway). Usually lintels are large stones that are wider than the openings.
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Vault- an extended archway (e.g.- the vaulted ceiling of a cathedral) 1) A simple extended arch is called a barrel, or wagon vault. 2) Two intersecting barrel vaults form a groin vault, which has a peak at the center.
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Column: free standing vertical support design Pier: vertical support design inset into a wall
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Stress and Strain: 1) Stress is the resistance of the material to a load applied over a unit area (it is given in units of psi or kg.cm2) 2) Strain is the linear distortion of a material under stress (i.e. the amount that a beam shrinks when under compression). It is dimensionless. 3) Shear: shear is the tendency of layers of molecules to slip sideways in relation to one another. The ability to resist this slippage is called shear strength.
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Bonding of masonry; · Mortar is the term used to describe the material used between bricks, and sometimes stone. · MORTAR HAS NO ADHESIVE EFFECT on the bricks (or stones), although it does bond to the bricks or stones. · It gives no tensile strength to the wall. · What makes masonry walls stable is gravity. · What mortar is used for, is to seat the bricks against each other (i.e. to provide an even bed, and to fill in any holes or inconsistencies so that water is kept out). Constituents of mortar are as follows: 1) Portland cement 2) Lime 3) Sand 4) Water 5) Color dies can be added for effect 6) Also, admixtures are available to increase waterproofing, and bonding. Thrust:
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Lecture 6-Masonry Construction - Lecture Six Masonry...

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