UpdatedChapter 2 Notes

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 (1)
The
more
electronegative
atom
draws
electron
density
closer
to
itself.
 Polar
covalent
bonds
occur
when
a
covalent
bond
is
formed
between
two
atoms
of
 differing
electronegativities.
 Polar
Covalent
Bonds
 (1)
The
more
electronegative
atom
draws
electron
density
closer
to
itself.
 (2)
The
more
electronegative
atom
develops
a
partial
negative
charge
(δ‐)
and
the
less.
 electronegative
atom
develops
a
partial
positive
charge
(δ+).
 Polar
covalent
bonds
occur
when
a
covalent
bond
is
formed
between
two
atoms
of
 differing
electronegativities.
 Polar
Covalent
Bonds
 (1)
The
more
electronegative
atom
draws
electron
density
closer
to
itself.
 (2)
The
more
electronegative
atom
develops
a
partial
negative
charge
(δ‐)
and
the
less.
 electronegative
atom
develops
a
partial
positive
charge
(δ+).
 (3)
A
bond
which
is
polarized
is
a
dipole
and
has
a
dipole
moment.
 Polar
covalent
bonds
occur
when
a
covalent
bond
is
formed
between
two
atoms
of
 differing
electronegativities.
 Polar
Covalent
Bonds
 (1)
The
more
electronegative
atom
draws
electron
density
closer
to
itself.
 (2)
The
more
electronegative
atom
develops
a
partial
negative
charge
(δ‐)
and
the
less.
 electronegative
atom
develops
a
partial
positive
charge
(δ+).
 (3)
A
bond
which
is
polarized
is
a
dipole
and
has
a
dipole
moment.
 (4)
The
direction
of
the
dipole
can
be
indicated
by
a
dipole
arrow.

The
arrow
head
is
the
 negative
end
of
a
dipole,
the
crossed
end
is
the
positive
end.

 Example:
hydrogen
chloride
 The
more
electronegative
chlorine
draws
electron
density
away
from
the
hydrogen.

 Chlorine
develops
a
partial
negative
charge
and
hydrogen
develops
a
partial
negative
 charge.
 Example:
hydrogen
chloride
 The
more
electronegative
chlorine
draws
electron
density
away
from
the
hydrogen.

 Chlorine
develops
a
partial
negative
charge
and
hydrogen
develops
a
partial
negative
 charge.
 The
dipole
moment
of
a
molecule
can
be
measured
experimentally.

It
is
the
product
of
 the
magnitude
of
the
charges
(in
electrostatic
units:
esu)
and
the
distance
between
the
 charges
(in
cm).

The
actual
unit
of
measurement
is
a
Debye
(D)
which
is
equivalent
to
1
 x
10‐18
esu
cm.
 A
map
of
electrostatic
potential
(MEP)
is
a
way
to
visualize
distribution
of
charge
in
a
 molecule.

Parts
of
the
molecule
which
are
red
have
relatively
more
electr...
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This note was uploaded on 06/19/2009 for the course CHEM 2311 taught by Professor Tyson during the Fall '07 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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