updatedChapter 2 Notes

Polarcovalentbonds

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by
suggesting
there
are
two
resonance
hybrids
that
contribute
equally
to
 the
real
structure.

The
real
structure
is
often
depicted
as
a
hexagon
with
a
circle
in
the
 middle
 Molecular
orbital
theory
explains
the
equal
bond
lengths
of
benzene
by
suggesting
there
 in
a
continuous
overlap
of
p
orbitals
over
the
entire
ring.
 Molecular
orbital
theory
explains
the
equal
bond
lengths
of
benzene
by
suggesting
there
 in
a
continuous
overlap
of
p
orbitals
over
the
entire
ring.
 (1)
All
carbons
in
benzene
are
sp2
hybridized.

 Molecular
orbital
theory
explains
the
equal
bond
lengths
of
benzene
by
suggesting
there
 in
a
continuous
overlap
of
p
orbitals
over
the
entire
ring.
 (1)
All
carbons
in
benzene
are
sp2
hybridized.

 (2)
Each
carbon
also
has
a
p
orbital
oriented
perpendicular
to
the
ring.

Each
p
orbital
 contributes
one
electron
to
the
π
system.
 Molecular
orbital
theory
explains
the
equal
bond
lengths
of
benzene
by
suggesting
there
 in
a
continuous
overlap
of
p
orbitals
over
the
entire
ring.
 (1)
All
carbons
in
benzene
are
sp2
hybridized.

 (2)
Each
carbon
also
has
a
p
orbital
oriented
perpendicular
to
the
ring.

Each
p
orbital
 contributes
one
electron
to
the
π
system.
 (3)
Each
p
orbital
does
not
just
overlap
with
one
adjacent
p
but
overlaps
with
p
orbitals
 on
either
side
to
give
a
continuous
bonding
molecular
orbital
that
encompasses
all
6
 carbons.
 Molecular
orbital
theory
explains
the
equal
bond
lengths
of
benzene
by
suggesting
there
 in
a
continuous
overlap
of
p
orbitals
over
the
entire
ring.
 (1)
All
carbons
in
benzene
are
sp2
hybridized.

 (2)
Each
carbon
also
has
a
p
orbital
oriented
perpendicular
to
the
ring.

Each
p
orbital
 contributes
one
electron
to
the
π
system.
 (3)
Each
p
orbital
does
not
just
overlap
with
one
adjacent
p
but
overlaps
with
p
orbitals
 on
either
side
to
give
a
continuous
bonding
molecular
orbital
that
encompasses
all
6
 carbons.
 (4)
All
6
π
electrons
are
therefore
delocalized
over
the
entire
ring
and
this
results
in
the
 equivalence
of
all
of
the
carbon‐carbon
bonds.
 Polar
covalent
bonds
occur
when
a
covalent
bond
is
formed
between
two
atoms
of
 differing
electronegativities.
 Polar
Covalent
Bonds
 Polar
covalent
bonds
occur
when
a
covalent
bond
is
formed
between
two
atoms
of
 differing
electronegativities.
 Polar
Covalent
B...
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This note was uploaded on 06/19/2009 for the course CHEM 2311 taught by Professor Tyson during the Fall '07 term at Georgia Tech.

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