Lecture 3(done) - Lecture 3 PLANT EVOLUTION Learning...

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Lecture 3 PLANT EVOLUTION
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Learning Objectives: To acquire knowledge of the characteristics and traits of simplest land plants to the more complex ones To describe the importance of evolution of early plants that gave rise to land-dwelling plants.
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Learning Outcomes Upon successful completion of the  lecture, students will be able to: To explain the attributes of the all land- dwelling plants in terms of their reproduction  cycle and traits that allow them to survive  on land To relate the importance of the simplest  land plants in evolution of more complex  land plants.
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Characteristics of Land Plants Multicelled, photoautotrophs Root and shoot systems Vascular tissues Cuticle  Stomates
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Root system: underground absorptive structures anchors plants. Shoot system: 2 forms lignin (an organic compound in cell walls). Root and Shoot systems
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Xylem: transports water and minerals through the plants Phloem: transports dissolved sugars & other photosynthetic products Vascular tissues
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Cuticle and stomates Cuticle: waxy coating that prevents the loss of water Stomata an opening beneath leaves & some stem for CO 2 & water loss.
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All plants undergo haploid and diploid stages in their life cycle. Alternations of Generations
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Haploid vs Diploid Stages Haploid phase: Production of gametes Often called as gametophyte Diploid phase: Production of spores from the fusion of the gametes Often called as sporophyte
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Gametophyte: Haploid bodies producing haploid gametes; sperms/pollens and eggs Sporophyte: Is a resultant from the fused gametes Produces spores Gametophyte vs Sporophyte
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From Haploid to Diploid Dominance Plant history shows gradual shift from gametophyte dominance to sporophyte dominance Gametophyte is dominant in green-algal like plants Sporophyte is dominant in more evolved and complex plants
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Spores Resistant structures Typically walled Enables the new generation to withstand harsh environmental conditions
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Dominant Gametophyte
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Lecture 3(done) - Lecture 3 PLANT EVOLUTION Learning...

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