Chapter 8 Electron Configurations and Periodicity (Lecture 13 - 16)done

Chapter 8 Electron Configurations and Periodicity (Lecture 13 - 16)done

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Chapter 8 Electron Configurations and Periodicity 8.1 Electron Spin and the Pauli Exclusion Principle 8.2 Building-Up principle and the Periodic Table 8.3 Writing Electron Configuration Using the Periodic Table 8.4 Orbital Diagrams of Atoms; Hund’s Rule 8.5 Mendeleev’s Predictions from the Periodic Table 8.6 Some Periodic Properties 8.7 Periodicity in the Main-Group Elements
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Ψ = fn(n, l , m l , m s ) spin quantum number m s m s = +½ or m s = -½ m s = +½ The arrow points up when ms =+ ½ and points down when ms = – ½. A paramagnetic substance is a substance that is weakly attracted by a magnetic field, and this attraction is generally a result of unpaired electrons . A diamagnetic substance is a substance that is slightly repelled by a magnetic field generally means that the substance has only paired electrons 8.1 Electron Spin
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Existence of electron in atom is described by its unique wave function Ψ . Pauli exclusion principle - no two electrons in an atom can have the same four quantum numbers. Ψ = fn(n, l , m l , m s ) Each seat is uniquely identified (E, R12, S8) Each seat can hold only one individual at a time 8.1 Electron Spin and the Pauli Exclusion Principle 8.2 Building-Up principle
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Orbitals and Quantum Number Ψ = fn(n, l , m l , m s ) Shell – electrons with the same value of n Subshell – electrons with the same values of n and l Orbital – electrons with the same values of n, l , and m l How many electrons can an orbital hold? Ψ = (n, l , m l , ½ ) or Ψ = (n, l , m l , - ½ ) An orbital can hold 2 electrons
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How many 2p orbitals are there in an atom? 2p n=2 l = 1 If l = 1, then m l = -1, 0, or +1 3 orbitals How many electrons can be placed in the 3d subshell? 3d n=3 l = 2 If l = 2, then m l = -2, -1, 0, +1, or +2 5 orbitals which can hold a total of 10 e -
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n, l, m and s enable us to label completely an electron in any orbital in any atom. Electron configuration of the atom showed how the electrons are distributed among the various atomic orbitals. Electron Configuration of an atom is
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Chapter 8 Electron Configurations and Periodicity (Lecture 13 - 16)done

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