CHAPTER 3 HW

CHAPTER 3 HW - CHAPTER 3 HW 3.2. In an iron-rich material,...

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CHAPTER 3 HW 3.2. In an iron-rich material, each carbon atom bonds with three iron atoms to form iron carbide, also called cementite. Iron carbide is 6.7% carbon by weight. Thus, on the phase diagram, a carbon weight of 6.7% corresponds to 100% iron carbide. However, only the iron rich portion is of particular significance. 3.4. A maximum carbon content less than 0.3%. 3.6 Annealing – Its objective is to refine the grain, soften the steel, remove internal stresses, remove gases, increase ductility and toughness, and change electrical and magnetic properties. Four types: Full Annealing, Process Annealing, Stress Relief Annealing, and Spheroidization. Normalizing – Steel is normalized by heating to about 60 c (110 f) above the austenite line and then cooling under natural convection. The material is then air cooled. It produces a uniform, fine grained microstructure. Doesn’t work well with parts of varying thicknesses. Since structural plate has a uniform thickness, normalization is an effective process and results in high fracture toughness of the material. Hardening – Steel is hardened by heating it to a temperature above the
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CHAPTER 3 HW - CHAPTER 3 HW 3.2. In an iron-rich material,...

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