Analytical Paragraph

Analytical Paragraph - The Analytical Paragraph Definition...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: The Analytical Paragraph Definition An "analytical paragraph" is a body paragraph that relies on information from an outside text for its development. The Analytical Paragraph Definition It is "analytical" in that it reflects the writer's identification of a passage from a text for use as a reference for discussion in the paragraph. The Analytical Paragraph Forms of references: Short quotations Long quotations Paraphrases Summaries Allusions The Analytical Paragraph The Plan of the Paragraph The Topic Sentence A Lead-in Sentence A Quotation (or other form of reference) A Response to the Quotation The Analytical Paragraph The federal government must loosen restrictions on "search and seizure" laws in order to allow authorities to pursue suspected terrorists in the United States. In his October 4th, 2001, Newsweek article, "Are We Prepared?" reporter Todd Bartlett responds to Attorney General John Ashcroft's appeal for additional, more liberal laws: The federal authorities want looser laws that will extend the powers of law enforcement agencies, to enter homes, search for suspected evidence, plant surveillance devices, and to exit without notifying the targets. More liberal wiretap laws would also allow agents to monitor multiple devices and at different locations. The "feds" have lobbied for such legislation in the past, notes Bartlett, hoping to tighten their enforcement of drug codes and extend their investigations, but the American Civil Liberties Union has been successful each time in quashing such attempts. Now, in the aftermath of September 11th terrorist attacks, Bartlett suggests that Congress is likely to be more receptive. Such legislation will assuredly end up before the Supreme Court and could be found unconstitutional. Should the Supreme Court rule against such new laws, the American people should consider a Constitutional amendment. The federal government must loosen restrictions on "search and seizure" laws in order to allow authorities to pursue suspected terrorists in the United States. In his October 4th, 2001, Newsweek article, "Are We Prepared?" reporter Todd Bartlett responds to Attorney General John Ashcroft's appeal for additional, more liberal laws: The federal authorities want looser laws that will extend the powers of law enforcement agencies, to enter homes, search for suspected evidence, plant surveillance devices, and to exit without notifying the targets. More liberal wiretap laws would also allow agents to monitor multiple devices and at different locations. The "feds" have lobbied for such legislation in the past, notes Bartlett, hoping to tighten their enforcement of drug codes and extend their investigations, but the American Civil Liberties Union has been successful each time in quashing such attempts. Now, in the aftermath of September 11th terrorist attacks, Bartlett suggests that Congress is likely to be more receptive. Such legislation will assuredly end up before the Supreme Court and could be found unconstitutional. Should the Supreme Court rule against such new laws, the American people should consider a Constitutional amendment. The Analytical Paragraph ...
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online