final paper.docx - Radhika Tantia 1510110291 Rashmi Bhatnagar ENG 441 6th December 2018 For a long time now women have been debarred from showing their

final paper.docx - Radhika Tantia 1510110291 Rashmi...

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Radhika Tantia 1510110291 Rashmi Bhatnagar ENG 441 6 th December, 2018 For a long time now, women have been debarred from showing their craft even though they are essentially a basic symbolism of procreation. We understand that women are talkative but it is often a prejudice that people seek that whatever they talk have no purpose, it is irrelevant and irrational like the nature of women which is theorised to us by the most writers. This paper is going to take a dig on the patriarchal society that women belonged to in the early 18 th century and late 19 th century. In this essay ‘A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf’ we see a breakage in this convention of natural occurrence of rational and irrational beings. We will also talk about the shared dialogue of Woolf with Alice Walker’s essay “In Search of Our Mothers’ Garden” while screening through Mary Wollstonecraft’s “A Vindication of the Rights of Women” that Woolf skilfully inspires through to explore and discuss the impediments of women literature and women writers. In her essay Virginia Woolf has very intelligently used the literary idea of stream of consciousness to answer the question of women and fiction by the addressing the readers as ‘you’ as Woolf is not removed from the situation herself hence, begins a story while illustrating her mental expression by representing various external material reality in the pursuit of capturing the essence of the discussion. Stream of consciousness allows the author to be able to picture the mind at work and brings about relation in things as one further goes deeper in reading the essay. “A women must have money and a room of her own if she is to
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write fiction,” (Chapter 1, Page 1) Woolf produces this answer in the introductory paragraph while commenting on the matter of women and fiction. She poses several questions to implore what exactly is meant by women and fiction. The understanding of the “ title women and fiction might mean, and you may have meant it to mean, women and what they are like, or it might mean women and the fiction that they write; or it might mean women and the fiction that is written about them,” (Chapter 1, Page 1) helps the author to expand on implicit questions like why weren’t there more women writers? Why do you think women aren’t creative? Where did the creativity of women go? Why will women not have access to creativity? Such questions are pretences to the digression of thoughts where author manoeuvres on the boundaries of the discourse. And similar viewing is seen in Alice Walker’s reading when she begins discussing a writing of Jean Toomer “I described her own nature and temperament. Told how they needed a larger life for their expression.”(Page 401) This line is a capsule reading to what Woolf has emphasized about having a room to express oneself freely and without hesitation is coinciding with having a larger life.
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