CLCS 1101 Lecture - Professor Matthew Landry Guide to Literary Analysis 1 What is the genre a What indications does the text give you about some of

CLCS 1101 Lecture - Professor Matthew Landry Guide to...

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Professor Matthew Landry Guide to Literary Analysis 1. What is the genre? a. What indications does the text give you about some of its possible motifs and imagery? 2. Key elements a. Genre, character, plot, narrative, important oppositions, motifs, metaphors, imagery, style, conventions, and counter-conventional elements 3. What are the main points in the storyF a. What problem will be resolved- from the characters point of view and in the more global sense? 4. What’s the narrative structure? a. How is the story told (prologue, in medias res, by letter, dialogue, allegorical?) 5. Contects a. How is the historical context a factor in the text? b. What are some important paratextual elements? Epic of Gilgamesh The Buried Book -rediscovered (discovery attributed to Hormuzd Rassam) 1853 BCE -translated into English around 1870 BCE The Invention of Writing
-cuneiform -phonetic alphabet, not a language but a way of writing language (scribing orature) -earliest glyphs were pictographic -one sign=one syllable -NOT for general population Orature → Literature -epic poems meant to be performed, not read -so, reading Gilgamesh is like reading a play -no figure/individual of “author” -earliest written works were transcribed songs or stories -literature=written things -epic poems freely improvised based on form of material Stock phrases and formulas: -anaphora = repetition of a sequence of words (inventory effect on audience and easier for performer to remember) -enumeration = a list of details about a subject, having amplifying effect upon the subject being described -short clauses, diction characteristic of Sumerian epic Interpretation -Gilgamesh needs wisdom, comes from Enkidu -Enkidu needs “taming”
Gilgamesh: -physiclaly perfect -right to rule, a demigod -proud, reckless -wisdom is a prominent motif -older people have unknowable wisdom, such and trapper’s father knowing what trapper should do, what Gilgamesh would say, and the outcome -Enkidu is kind of pre-human, needs to be civilized (done by Shamhat, through her being super hot) Therefore, Civilization= -seduction/sex for pleasure -staying in one place, settlement and shelter -wearing clothes -following rituals -eating bread, drinking beer -bathing -occupations: prostitution, hunting, sheepherding -taking on a social role -having a companion Women Associated with Civilization -Ninsun, mother of Gilgamesh and her wisdom -Aruru, goddess of birth- creates Enkidu for Gilgamesh’s companionship
-Shamalat, prostitute who civilized Enkidu “Like a guardian deity she led him” Giglamesh and Enkidu- same-sex love -sex for pleasure glorified in this poem, shown as quest for wisdom and civility “Oh, let me show you Gilgamesh, the joy-woe man. Look at him, gaze upon his face. He is radiant with virility, manly vigor is his, The whole of his body is seductively gorgeous Gilgmesh will dream of you in Uruk” (I, 225-236) “...my making it your partner, Your falling in love with it, your caressing it like a women, Means there will come to you a strong one, A companion who rescues a friends{...] You will fall in love with him and caress him like a woman.

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