Presidential Politics of Recognition part 1

Presidential Politics of Recognition part 1 - To Look Like...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: To Look Like America The Presidential Politics of Recognition D. Jason Berggren University of Georgia Spring 2008 President as Chief Representative Many view the President as the countrys chief representative of the American people James Wilson-PA--man of the people (Ellis and Nelson p. 76) Gouverneur Morris-NY-- the great protector of the mass of the people after all, the President (and VP) is only federal official elected countrywide Andrew Jackson was first president to speak of the presidential mandate--his electoral victory interpreted as popular support for his policies (Robert Dahl 1990) President as Chief Representative President James Polk said the president represents the whole of the people Theodore Roosevelt said the president is the steward of the people bound actively and affirmatively to do all he could for the people Indeed, TR believed, the president is compelled to do anything that the needs of the nation demanded (unless of course specifically prohibited to do so by the Constitution or acts of Congress) But since Woodrow Wilson, view of modern presidents is that presidents alone represent the American people, nation as a whole The Wilsonian View The President is at liberty, both in law and conscience, to be as big a man as he can. His capacity will set the limit Members of the House and Senate are representatives of localities, are voted for only by sections of voters There is no national party choice except that of President. No one else represents the people as a whole, exercising a national choiceThe nation as a whole has chosen him, and is conscious that it has no other political spokesman. His is the only national voice in affairsHe is the representative of no constituency, but of the whole people. When he speaks in his true character, he speaks for no special...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 04/02/2008 for the course POLIS 1101 taught by Professor Berggren during the Spring '08 term at University of Georgia Athens.

Page1 / 17

Presidential Politics of Recognition part 1 - To Look Like...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online